2017-2018 Dry Edible Bean Prices: Where do we go from here?

Yes… We are alive over here at http://www.drypintobeans.com! It’s been a quiet one this season, but we are alive and kicking now bean lovers! So…Where do we go from here? It’s a good question. Dry edible bean prices did not move much this season. Prices have remain subdued for various reasons. Slow export sales to Mexico and other Latin markets have been lackluster this year causing prices to be soft. The USDA weekly report has not provided any real insight into price action. Most dealers have been off the board for several weeks…now turning into months. Overall, things have been flat in a market that has been waiting for planting season to arrive so weather related issues could drive price action. Below are graphs of North Dakota and Michigan, both with opposite weather problems.

Two of the US’s largest dry edible bean growing States: North Dakota and Michigan are experiencing averse weather conditions. Western and Central North Dakota is suffering drought-like conditions and is in bad need of moisture, and the recent flooding in Michigan’s dry edible bean growing Counties of Huron, Bay, Midland, and Isabella is causing most dealers to be off the board until damage has been assessed properly. Needless to say, this is the first sign of real volatility the US dry edible bean industry has experienced all season. Growers are bullish for the first time in awhile and with Mother Nature coming into play late into the planting season, it looks like she will dominate the market’s price action until harvest.

Aside from weather problems influencing bean price action, Mexico, which is one of the US’s main export markets for dry edible beans has not been buying this season. Why? The Mexican Peso has been on the receiving end of US dollar strength since Trump took office and threatened to pull out of NAFTA. However, in the past several months the Mexican Peso has been gaining strength, and increasing Mexico’s purchasing power to buy beans from the USA. Below is a monthly chart of USD/MXN, current price is roughly 17.81 MXN Pesos for every 1 US dollar. USDMXN M1 (06-28-2017 1252)

That being said, Mexico’s purchasing power has been quietly increasing for the past few months. Perhaps by the time new crop dry edible beans are ready to be harvested, the Peso will be stronger and Mexico will step back into the US market to purchase.

Circling back to the original question asked: Where do we go from here, who really knows? But losing acreage to soybeans, present averse bean growing weather conditions, insurance deadlines, and a lack of offers from growers is potentially setting the stage for “the perfect storm” in certain dry edible bean varieties.

Looking above at prices for Black beans from Michigan and North Dakota, we can see a historical price average for each month going back to 2011-2012.  The 2015-2016 season was the lowest prices on black beans being offered from dealers and growers, which can be viewed as bottom in prices going back eight years. This is pretty significant because dry edible bean prices do not typically spike or drop in a short matter of time unless catastrophic weather or outside markets influence price action. However, given the fact two of the largest US bean producing states are experiencing averse weather conditions and the largest importer of United States dry edible beans has continued to gain purchasing power; industry participants should wake up and smell the bean dust!

The 2017-2018 dry edible bean planting season is off to a volatile start. Should averse weather conditions continue to influence this year’s dry edible bean crop and Mexico’s Peso continue to strengthen, we could have a recipe which would create “the perfect storm” for black bean and pinto bean prices to surge. These two varieties seem to be positioned best for an upside move based on today’s market conditions; whereas other bean varieties do not have as much bullish potential from the volatility currently being experienced.

Bottom line: It’s still way too early to fully calculate the extent of the weather damage across State lines, but dry edible bean bulls have the conn right now.

Recent update dated July 5, 2017 from Michigan Bean Commission Leader Joe “The Man”‘Cramer… (Not to be confused with Mad Money’s “Jim Cramer”… Joe is better)

I asked some agronomy folks to give me a couple of comments on the dry bean crop in their respective areas this morning.  Thought I’d share the feedback I received…

 

  • Just looked at some more this morning. For the most part stands are fair to good depending on planting time. I think most of the growers I work with finished 7 to 10 days ago. We have beans we have sprayed, with cultivation starting and beans just coming through. The roots look good so far, very little root rot showing up (so far)

 

  • In the Richville/Reese/F’muth area most of the beans are struggling due to the rains of the past few weeks, but nothing bad enough to replant.  Post herbicide applications are taking place this week.  Of course, there are drowned out holes, but in general I would consider the beans to be much better than most had expected.  We are dealing with some root rot issues with many growers attempting to foliar feed to help them along while they generate new roots. The replants (due to seed issues) seem to look the worst, as they were replanted right before the rain started.  Any beans that were well established prior to the rain seems to have taken it pretty well.

 

  • Our crop condition is all over the board.  We have had to do some replanting due to the wet soil conditions.  Some are just starting to plant for the first time because it was too dry, and then too wet!  I took a ride out to Caseville yesterday – there are a lot of holes in fields out that way.  Post weed control application has begun.  If I had to sum it up in one word, our crop is “Fair.
  • Michigan Bean Commission | 516 South Main Street, Suite D, Frankenmuth, Michigan  48734 | 989.262.8550

Dry Edible Bean Area Planted

USA Dry Edible Bean 2015-2016 Crop Production Numbers

Dry Edible Bean Area Planted, Harvested, Yield, and Production – States and

United States: 2014 and Forecasted October 1, 2015

——————————————————————————–

:         Area planted          :        Area harvested

State     :—————————————————————

:     2014      :     2015      :     2014      :     2015

——————————————————————————–

:                          1,000 acres

:

Arizona 1/ …..:       11.0             9.0            10.9             8.9

California …..:       48.0            43.0            47.5            42.5

Colorado …….:       46.0            49.0            44.0            46.0

Idaho ……….:      125.0           120.0           124.0           119.0

Kansas ………:        7.5             7.0             6.9             6.5

Michigan …….:      250.0           270.0           245.3           266.0

Minnesota ……:      155.0           190.0           148.0           182.0

Montana 1/ …..:       37.5            46.0            37.0            45.0

Nebraska …….:      165.0           140.0           152.0           129.0

New Mexico 1/ ..:       10.5            12.5            10.5            12.4

:

New York …….:        8.0             8.0             7.7             7.8

North Dakota …:      630.0           660.0           615.0           645.0

Oregon 1/ ……:        8.5            10.0             8.5            10.0

South Dakota …:       14.0            12.5            12.9            11.7

Texas ……….:       23.0            31.0            21.0            28.0

Washington …..:      130.0           110.0           129.0           109.0

Wisconsin 1/ …:        7.9             7.9             7.9             7.9

Wyoming ……..:       42.0            31.0            37.6            29.5

:

United States ..:    1,718.9         1,756.9         1,665.7         1,706.2

——————————————————————————–

:       Yield per acre 2/       :         Production 2/

State     :—————————————————————

:     2014      :     2015      :     2014      :     2015

——————————————————————————–

:      ——- pounds ——          —— 1,000 cwt —–

:

Arizona 1/ …..:      1,940           1,950             211             174

California …..:      2,190           2,200           1,040             935

Colorado …….:      1,900           2,300             835           1,058

Idaho ……….:      1,800           1,800           2,232           2,142

Kansas ………:      1,710           1,700             118             111

Michigan …….:      1,940           1,900           4,749           5,054

Minnesota ……:      1,950           1,950           2,887           3,549

Montana 1/ …..:      1,630           1,800             603             810

Nebraska …….:      2,500           2,300           3,800           2,967

New Mexico 1/ ..:      1,900           2,100             200             260

:

New York …….:      1,490           1,900             115             148

North Dakota …:      1,430           1,200           8,795           7,740

Oregon 1/ ……:      2,260           2,300             192             230

South Dakota …:      1,880           2,050             243             240

Texas ……….:      1,220           1,150             256             322

Washington …..:      1,500           1,400           1,935           1,526

Wisconsin 1/ …:      2,480           2,500             196             198

Wyoming ……..:      2,130           2,200             799             649

:

United States ..:      1,753           1,648          29,206          28,113

——————————————————————————–

Weekly USDA Crop Production

Crop Production

ISSN: 1936-3737

Released November 8, 2013, by the National Agricultural Statistics Service
(NASS), Agricultural Statistics Board, United States Department of
Agriculture (USDA).

Special Note
This report contains estimates and forecasts that were originally scheduled
for release in the October report. This includes updated planted and
harvested acreage for dry edible beans, canola, corn, sorghum, soybeans and
sunflowers. Also included are revised peanut and sunflower acreage, yield and
production for 2012, as well as indicated 2013/2014 production forecasts for
citrus fruits as of November 1.

Due to the cancellation of the 2013 October Crop Production report, there are
no October 1 yield forecasts to include in this report.

Small Grain Update
Survey respondents who reported barley, oats, Durum wheat, or other spring
wheat acreage as not yet harvested in Montana and North Dakota during the
surveys conducted in preparation for the Small Grains 2013 Summary, released
September 30, 2013, were re-contacted in late October to determine how many
of those acres were actually harvested and record the actual production from
those acres. Based on this updated information, several changes were made to
the estimates published in the Small Grains 2013 Summary. Because unharvested
production is a component of on-farm stocks, changes were made to the
September 1 on-farm stocks levels comparable with the production adjustments.

Corn Production Up 1 Percent from September Forecast
Soybean Production Up 3 Percent
Cotton Production Up 2 Percent
Orange Production Down 5 Percent from Last Season

Corn production is forecast at 14.0 billion bushels, up 1 percent from the
previous forecast and up 30 percent from 2012. If realized, this will be a
new record production for the United States. Based on conditions as of
November 1, yields are expected to average 160.4 bushels per acre, up
5.1 bushels from the previous forecast and 37.0 bushels above the 2012
average. If realized, this will be the highest average yield since 2009. Area
harvested for grain is forecast at 87.2 million acres, down 2 percent from
the previous forecast and down slightly from 2012.

Soybean production is forecast at 3.26 billion bushels, up 3 percent from the
previous forecast and up 7 percent from last year. If realized, production
will be the third largest on record. Based on November 1 conditions, yields
are expected to average 43.0 bushels per acre, up 1.8 bushels from the
previous forecast and up 3.2 bushels from 2012. Area for harvest in the
United States is forecast at 75.7 million acres, down 1 percent from both the
previous forecast and last year.

All cotton production is forecast at 13.1 million 480-pound bales, up
2 percent from the September forecast but down 24 percent from last year.
Yield is expected to average 808 pounds per harvested acre, up 79 pounds from
last year. Upland cotton production is forecast at 12.5 million
480-pound bales, down 25 percent from 2012. Pima cotton production, forecast
at 625,500 bales, was carried forward from the previous forecast.

The United States all orange forecast for the 2013-2014 season is
7.96 million tons, down 5 percent from the 2012-2013 final utilization. The
Florida all orange forecast, at 125 million boxes (5.63 million tons), is
down 6 percent from last season’s final utilization. Early, midseason, and
Navel varieties in Florida are forecast at 58.0 million boxes (2.61 million
tons), down 14 percent from last season. The Florida Valencia orange
forecast, at 67.0 million boxes (3.02 million tons), is up 1 percent from
last season’s final utilization. The early months of 2013 brought little
precipitation and average temperatures to the citrus growing region.
Significant rainfall returned in late spring and slowly eliminated drought
conditions by the first week in July. Seasonal temperatures coupled with
above average precipitation continued throughout the summer months and kept
citrus groves drought free through mid-October. California’s Navel orange
crop is getting underway with growers expecting good quality fruit.

Florida frozen concentrated orange juice (FCOJ) yield forecast for the
2013-2014 season is 1.60 gallons per box at 42.0 degrees Brix, up
1 percent from last season’s final yield of 1.59 gallons per box. Projected
yield from the 2013-2014 Early-Midseason and Valencia varieties will be
published in the January Crop Production report. All projections of yield
assume the processing relationships this season will be similar to those of
the past several seasons.

This report was approved on November 8, 2013.

Acting Secretary of
Agriculture
Michael T. Scuse

Agricultural Statistics Board
Chairperson
Hubert Hamer

Contents

Selected Crops Area Planted and Harvested – States and United States: 2013………………………………. 8

Corn for Grain Area Harvested, Yield, and Production – States and United States: 2012 and Forecasted
November 1, 2013………………………………………………………………………………….. 10

Corn Production – United States Chart……………………………………………………………….. 11

Sorghum for Grain Area Harvested, Yield, and Production – States and United States: 2012 and Forecasted
November 1, 2013………………………………………………………………………………….. 11

Rice Area Harvested, Yield, and Production – States and United States: 2012 and Forecasted
November 1, 2013………………………………………………………………………………….. 12

Rice Production by Class – United States: 2012 and Forecasted November 1, 2013…………………………… 12

Soybean Production – United States Chart…………………………………………………………….. 12

Soybeans for Beans Area Harvested, Yield, and Production – States and United States: 2012 and Forecasted
November 1, 2013………………………………………………………………………………….. 13

Cottonseed Production – United States: 2012 and Forecasted November 1, 2013……………………………… 14

Cotton Production – United States Chart……………………………………………………………… 14

Cotton Area Harvested, Yield, and Production by Type – States and United States: 2012 and Forecasted
November 1, 2013………………………………………………………………………………….. 15

Peanut Area Planted and Harvested, Yield, and Production – States and United States: 2012 and Forecasted
November 1, 2013………………………………………………………………………………….. 16

Sugarbeet Area Harvested, Yield, and Production – States and United States: 2012 and Forecasted
November 1, 2013………………………………………………………………………………….. 17

Sugarcane for Sugar and Seed Area Harvested, Yield, and Production – States and United States: 2012 and
Forecasted November 1, 2013………………………………………………………………………… 17

Lentil Area Planted and Harvested, Yield, and Production – States and United States: 2012 and Forecasted
November 1, 2013………………………………………………………………………………….. 17

Dry Edible Pea Area Planted and Harvested, Yield, and Production – States and United States: 2012 and
Forecasted November 1, 2013………………………………………………………………………… 18

Austrian Winter Pea Area Planted and Harvested, Yield, and Production – States and United States: 2012 and
Forecasted November 1, 2013………………………………………………………………………… 18

Utilized Production of Citrus Fruits by Crop – States and United States: 2012-2013 and Forecasted
November 1, 2013………………………………………………………………………………….. 19

Potato Area Planted and Harvested, Yield, and Production by Seasonal Group – States and United States: 2012
and Forecasted November 1, 2013…………………………………………………………………….. 20

Percent of Fall Potatoes Planted to Major Varieties – Selected States: 2013 Crop…………………………. 21

Percent of Fall Potatoes Planted to Major Varieties – Seven-State Total: 2013 Crop……………………….. 22

Barley Area Planted and Harvested, Yield, and Production – Selected States and United States: 2013…………. 23

Oat Area Planted and Harvested, Yield, and Production – Selected States and United States: 2013……………. 23

All Wheat Area Planted and Harvested, Yield, and Production – Selected States and United States: 2013………. 23

Durum Wheat Area Planted and Harvested, Yield, and Production – Selected States and United States: 2013…….. 23

Other Spring Wheat Area Planted and Harvested, Yield, and Production – Selected States and
United States: 2013……………………………………………………………………………….. 24

Wheat Production by Class – United States: 2011-2013………………………………………………….. 24

Barley Stocks by Position – Selected States and United States: September 1, 2013…………………………. 24

Oat Stocks by Position – Selected States and United States: September 1, 2013……………………………. 25

All Wheat Stocks by Position – Selected States and United States: September 1, 2013………………………. 25

Durum Wheat Stocks by Position – Selected States and United States: September 1, 2013…………………….. 25

Crop Area Planted and Harvested, Yield, and Production in Domestic Units – United States: 2012 and 2013…….. 26

Crop Area Planted and Harvested, Yield, and Production in Metric Units – United States: 2012 and 2013………. 28

Fruits and Nuts Production in Domestic Units – United States: 2013 and 2014……………………………… 30

Fruits and Nuts Production in Metric Units – United States: 2013 and 2014……………………………….. 31

Corn for Grain Plant Population per Acre – Selected States: 2009-2013…………………………………… 32

Corn for Grain Number of Ears per Acre – Selected States: 2009-2013…………………………………….. 33

Corn Objective Yield Percent of Samples Processed in the Lab – United States: 2009-2013…………………… 33

Corn for Grain Percentage Distribution by Plant Population Per Acre – Selected States: 2009-2013…………… 34

Corn for Grain Frequency of Farmer Reported Row Widths – Selected States: 2009-2013………………………. 35

Corn for Grain Percentage Distribution by Measured Row Width and Average Row Width – Selected
States: 2009-2013…………………………………………………………………………………. 36

Cotton Cumulative Boll Counts – Selected States: 2009-2013…………………………………………….. 37

Soybean Pods with Beans per 18 Square Feet – Selected States: 2009-2013…………………………………. 38

Soybean Frequency of Farmer Reported Row Widths – Selected States: 2009-2013…………………………….. 39

Soybean Objective Yield Percent of Samples Processed in the Lab – United States: 2009-2013………………… 40

Soybean Percentage Distribution by Measured Row Width and Average Row Width – Selected
States: 2009-2013…………………………………………………………………………………. 41

Fall Potato Number of Hills by Type – Selected States: 2009-2013……………………………………….. 43

Fall Potato Harvest Loss by Type – Selected States: 2009-2013………………………………………….. 44

Fall Potato Grading Categories by Type – Selected States: 2012 and 2013…………………………………. 45

Round Potato Size Categories by Type – Selected States: 2012 and 2013…………………………………… 45

Long Potato (Russet and Shepody) Size Categories – Maine: 2012 and 2013…………………………………. 46

All Long Potato Size Categories – Selected States: 2012 and 2013……………………………………….. 46

Percent of Normal Precipitation Map…………………………………………………………………. 47

Departure from Normal Temperature Map……………………………………………………………….. 47

October Weather Summary……………………………………………………………………………. 48

October Agricultural Summary……………………………………………………………………….. 48

Crop Comments…………………………………………………………………………………….. 50

Statistical Methodology……………………………………………………………………………. 54

Reliability of November 1 Crop Production Forecasts…………………………………………………… 55

Information Contacts………………………………………………………………………………. 56

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Selected Crops Area Planted and Harvested – States and United States: 2013
[Includes updates to planted and harvested area previously published]
————————————————————————————————
: Corn : Sorghum : Soybeans : Dry edible beans
State :——————————————————————————-
: Planted :Harvested: Planted :Harvested: Planted :Harvested: Planted :Harvested
————————————————————————————————
: 1,000 acres
:
Alabama ……..: 320 300 430 420
Arizona ……..: 80 38 33 11 12.0 12.0
Arkansas …….: 880 855 130 125 3,250 3,200
California …..: 580 170 50.0 49.5
Colorado …….: 1,220 1,000 400 240 38.0 35.0
Connecticut ….: 27
Delaware …….: 180 174 165 163
Florida ……..: 115 75 32 30
Georgia ……..: 510 460 50 35 230 220
Idaho ……….: 350 135 125.0 124.0
:
Illinois …….: 12,000 11,700 23 20 9,450 9,400
Indiana ……..: 6,000 5,800 5,200 5,180
Iowa ………..: 13,600 13,100 9,300 9,230
Kansas ………: 4,300 4,000 3,100 2,750 3,600 3,540 5.0 4.6
Kentucky …….: 1,530 1,430 1,650 1,640
Louisiana ……: 680 670 115 110 1,120 1,090
Maine ……….: 31
Maryland …….: 480 420 480 475
Massachusetts ..: 16
Michigan …….: 2,650 2,340 1,900 1,890 175.0 170.0
:
Minnesota ……: 8,600 8,100 6,700 6,630 120.0 115.0
Mississippi ….: 860 815 62 57 2,010 1,980
Missouri …….: 3,350 3,150 70 60 5,600 5,540
Montana ……..: 120 70 19.2 18.1
Nebraska …….: 9,950 9,550 290 130 4,800 4,750 130.0 120.0
Nevada ………: 8
New Hampshire ..: 14
New Jersey …..: 90 80 89 87
New Mexico …..: 120 37 125 50 13.0 13.0
New York …….: 1,200 720 275 272 8.0 7.7
:
North Carolina .: 940 870 1,460 1,440
North Dakota …: 3,800 3,500 4,650 4,610 440.0 420.0
Ohio ………..: 3,900 3,630 4,450 4,430
Oklahoma …….: 370 315 320 230 345 310
Oregon ………: 80 49 8.0 8.0
Pennsylvania …: 1,450 1,060 520 510
Rhode Island …: 2
South Carolina .: 350 330 320 310
South Dakota …: 6,200 5,600 350 260 4,600 4,550 12.0 11.3
Tennessee ……: 900 835 1,560 1,520
:
Texas ……….: 2,350 2,050 3,000 2,600 105 90 32.0 30.0
Utah ………..: 83 35
Vermont ……..: 92
Virginia …….: 520 355 600 590
Washington …..: 190 120 115.0 114.0
West Virginia ..: 53 34 22 21
Wisconsin ……: 4,100 3,200 1,580 1,570 5.4 5.4
Wyoming ……..: 100 60 35.0 33.0
:
United States ..: 95,341 87,232 8,068 6,678 76,493 75,688 1,342.6 1,290.6
————————————————————————————————
See footnote(s) at end of table. –continued

Selected Crops Area Planted and Harvested – States and United States: 2013 (continued)
[Includes updates to planted and harvested area previously published]
————————————————————————————————
: Canola : Sunflower
: : :———————————————————–
: : : Oil : Non-oil : All
:——————————————————————————-
State : Planted :Harvested: Planted :Harvested: Planted :Harvested: Planted :Harvested
————————————————————————————————
: 1,000 acres
:
California …..: 55.0 54.5 2.5 2.5 57.5 57.0
Colorado …….: 50.0 43.0 17.0 15.0 67.0 58.0
Idaho ……….: 44.0 43.0
Kansas ………: 55.0 50.0 16.0 15.0 71.0 65.0
Minnesota ……: 16.0 15.5 33.0 32.0 10.0 9.0 43.0 41.0
Montana ……..: 69.0 68.0
Nebraska …….: 28.0 26.0 15.0 14.0 43.0 40.0
North Dakota …: 920.0 910.0 425.0 415.0 74.0 71.0 499.0 486.0
Oklahoma …….: 230.0 175.0 3.0 2.8 2.0 1.7 5.0 4.5
Oregon ………: 13.0 12.1
:
South Dakota …: 560.0 545.0 120.0 115.0 680.0 660.0
Texas ……….: 70.0 60.0 43.0 24.0 113.0 84.0
Washington …..: 37.0 36.0
:
Other States 1/ : 40.0 24.9 (X) (X) (X) (X) (X) (X)
:
United States ..: 1,369.0 1,284.5 1,279.0 1,228.3 299.5 267.2 1,578.5 1,495.5
————————————————————————————————
(D) Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual operations.
(X) Not applicable.
1/ Other States for Canola include Colorado and Kansas.

Corn for Grain Area Harvested, Yield, and Production – States and United States: 2012 and
Forecasted November 1, 2013
———————————————————————————————
: Area harvested : Yield per acre : Production
:—————————————————————————
State : : : : 2013 : :
: 2012 : 2013 : 2012 :———————–: 2012 : 2013
: : : : October 1 :November 1 : :
———————————————————————————————
: 1,000 acres ———- bushels ——— — 1,000 bushels —
:
Alabama ………: 295 300 98.0 (NA) 150.0 28,910 45,000
Arkansas ……..: 695 855 178.0 (NA) 182.0 123,710 155,610
California ……: 180 170 185.0 (NA) 190.0 33,300 32,300
Colorado ……..: 1,010 1,000 133.0 (NA) 138.0 134,330 138,000
Delaware ……..: 178 174 135.0 (NA) 160.0 24,030 27,840
Georgia ………: 310 460 180.0 (NA) 183.0 55,800 84,180
Illinois ……..: 12,250 11,700 105.0 (NA) 180.0 1,286,250 2,106,000
Indiana ………: 6,030 5,800 99.0 (NA) 174.0 596,970 1,009,200
Iowa …………: 13,700 13,100 137.0 (NA) 169.0 1,876,900 2,213,900
Kansas ……….: 3,950 4,000 96.0 (NA) 130.0 379,200 520,000
:
Kentucky ……..: 1,530 1,430 68.0 (NA) 173.0 104,040 247,390
Louisiana …….: 530 670 173.0 (NA) 180.0 91,690 120,600
Maryland ……..: 435 420 122.0 (NA) 158.0 53,070 66,360
Michigan ……..: 2,390 2,340 133.0 (NA) 156.0 317,870 365,040
Minnesota …….: 8,330 8,100 165.0 (NA) 164.0 1,374,450 1,328,400
Mississippi …..: 795 815 165.0 (NA) 180.0 131,175 146,700
Missouri ……..: 3,300 3,150 75.0 (NA) 133.0 247,500 418,950
Nebraska ……..: 9,100 9,550 142.0 (NA) 169.0 1,292,200 1,613,950
New Jersey ……: 86 80 118.0 (NA) 143.0 10,148 11,440
New York ……..: 680 720 134.0 (NA) 150.0 91,120 108,000
:
North Carolina ..: 820 870 117.0 (NA) 140.0 95,940 121,800
North Dakota ….: 3,460 3,500 122.0 (NA) 107.0 422,120 374,500
Ohio …………: 3,650 3,630 123.0 (NA) 174.0 448,950 631,620
Oklahoma ……..: 295 315 110.0 (NA) 125.0 32,450 39,375
Pennsylvania ….: 1,000 1,060 132.0 (NA) 155.0 132,000 164,300
South Carolina ..: 310 330 122.0 (NA) 134.0 37,820 44,220
South Dakota ….: 5,300 5,600 101.0 (NA) 145.0 535,300 812,000
Tennessee …….: 960 835 85.0 (NA) 156.0 81,600 130,260
Texas ………..: 1,550 2,050 130.0 (NA) 138.0 201,500 282,900
Virginia ……..: 350 355 103.0 (NA) 150.0 36,050 53,250
Washington ……: 115 120 215.0 (NA) 210.0 24,725 25,200
Wisconsin …….: 3,300 3,200 121.0 (NA) 145.0 399,300 464,000
:
Other States 1/ .: 491 533 162.7 (NA) 162.2 79,878 86,435
:
United States …: 87,375 87,232 123.4 (NA) 160.4 10,780,296 13,988,720
———————————————————————————————
(NA) Not available.
1/ Other States include Arizona, Florida, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, West
Virginia, and Wyoming. Individual State level estimates will be published in the “Crop
Production 2013 Summary.”

Sorghum for Grain Area Harvested, Yield, and Production – States and United States: 2012 and
Forecasted November 1, 2013
————————————————————————————————
: Area harvested : Yield per acre : Production
:——————————————————————————
State : : : : 2013 : :
: 2012 : 2013 : 2012 :———————–: 2012 : 2013
: : : : October 1 :November 1 : :
————————————————————————————————
: 1,000 acres ———- bushels ———- 1,000 bushels
:
Arkansas ……..: 135 125 84.0 (NA) 88.0 11,340 11,000
Colorado ……..: 150 240 20.0 (NA) 28.0 3,000 6,720
Illinois ……..: 27 20 60.0 (NA) 95.0 1,620 1,900
Kansas ……….: 2,100 2,750 39.0 (NA) 68.0 81,900 187,000
Louisiana …….: 123 110 100.0 (NA) 102.0 12,300 11,220
Mississippi …..: 46 57 84.0 (NA) 85.0 3,864 4,845
Missouri ……..: 55 60 58.0 (NA) 89.0 3,190 5,340
Nebraska ……..: 60 130 59.0 (NA) 50.0 3,540 6,500
New Mexico ……: 19 50 42.0 (NA) 42.0 798 2,100
Oklahoma ……..: 150 230 27.0 (NA) 55.0 4,050 12,650
South Dakota ….: 140 260 42.0 (NA) 78.0 5,880 20,280
Texas ………..: 1,900 2,600 59.0 (NA) 55.0 112,100 143,000
:
Other States 1/ .: 50 46 67.0 (NA) 65.5 3,350 3,015
:
United States …: 4,955 6,678 49.8 (NA) 62.2 246,932 415,570
————————————————————————————————
(NA) Not available.
1/ Other States include Arizona and Georgia. Individual State level estimates will be
published in the “Crop Production 2013 Summary.”

Rice Area Harvested, Yield, and Production – States and United States: 2012 and Forecasted
November 1, 2013
————————————————————————————————-
: Area harvested : Yield per acre : Production 1/
:———————————————————————————-
State : : : : 2013 : :
: 2012 : 2013 : 2012 :————————-: 2012 : 2013
: : : : October 1 : November 1 : :
————————————————————————————————-
: 1,000 acres ———— pounds ———– —- 1,000 cwt —
:
Arkansas …..: 1,285 1,070 7,470 (NA) 7,550 95,992 80,785
California …: 556 556 8,110 (NA) 8,400 45,070 46,704
Louisiana ….: 397 412 6,430 (NA) 7,000 25,540 28,840
Mississippi ..: 129 129 7,200 (NA) 7,500 9,288 9,675
Missouri …..: 177 153 6,990 (NA) 6,950 12,372 10,634
Texas ……..: 134 144 8,370 (NA) 8,400 11,217 12,096
:
United States : 2,678 2,464 7,449 (NA) 7,660 199,479 188,734
————————————————————————————————-
(NA) Not available.
1/ Includes sweet rice production.

Rice Production by Class – United States: 2012 and Forecasted November 1, 2013
——————————————————————————–
: : : :
Year : Long grain : Medium grain : Short grain 1/ : All
: : : :
——————————————————————————–
: 1,000 cwt
:
2012 …….: 144,163 51,571 3,745 199,479
2013 2/ ….: 129,046 56,335 3,353 188,734
——————————————————————————–
1/ Sweet rice production included with short grain.
2/ The 2013 rice production by class forecasts are based on class harvested
acreage estimates and the 5-year average class yield compared to the all rice
yield.

Soybeans for Beans Area Harvested, Yield, and Production – States and United States: 2012
and Forecasted November 1, 2013
——————————————————————————————-
: Area harvested : Yield per acre : Production
:————————————————————————-
State : : : : 2013 : :
: 2012 : 2013 : 2012 :———————–: 2012 : 2013
: : : : October 1 :November 1 : :
——————————————————————————————-
: 1,000 acres ———- bushels ——— — 1,000 bushels —
:
Alabama ………: 335 420 45.0 (NA) 43.0 15,075 18,060
Arkansas ……..: 3,160 3,200 43.0 (NA) 45.0 135,880 144,000
Delaware ……..: 168 163 42.5 (NA) 40.0 7,140 6,520
Georgia ………: 215 220 37.5 (NA) 38.0 8,063 8,360
Illinois ……..: 8,930 9,400 43.0 (NA) 49.0 383,990 460,600
Indiana ………: 5,140 5,180 44.0 (NA) 50.0 226,160 259,000
Iowa …………: 9,310 9,230 44.5 (NA) 45.0 414,295 415,350
Kansas ……….: 3,810 3,540 22.5 (NA) 35.0 85,725 123,900
Kentucky ……..: 1,470 1,640 40.0 (NA) 49.0 58,800 80,360
Louisiana …….: 1,115 1,090 46.0 (NA) 47.0 51,290 51,230
:
Maryland ……..: 475 475 47.0 (NA) 40.0 22,325 19,000
Michigan ……..: 1,990 1,890 43.0 (NA) 44.0 85,570 83,160
Minnesota …….: 7,000 6,630 43.5 (NA) 39.0 304,500 258,570
Mississippi …..: 1,950 1,980 45.0 (NA) 43.0 87,750 85,140
Missouri ……..: 5,270 5,540 30.0 (NA) 35.0 158,100 193,900
Nebraska ……..: 4,990 4,750 41.5 (NA) 52.0 207,085 247,000
New Jersey ……: 94 87 39.0 (NA) 41.0 3,666 3,567
New York ……..: 312 272 46.0 (NA) 47.0 14,352 12,784
North Carolina ..: 1,580 1,440 39.5 (NA) 31.0 62,410 44,640
North Dakota ….: 4,730 4,610 34.5 (NA) 30.0 163,185 138,300
:
Ohio …………: 4,590 4,430 45.0 (NA) 49.0 206,550 217,070
Oklahoma ……..: 260 310 15.0 (NA) 27.0 3,900 8,370
Pennsylvania ….: 520 510 48.0 (NA) 49.0 24,960 24,990
South Carolina ..: 370 310 34.0 (NA) 26.0 12,580 8,060
South Dakota ….: 4,720 4,550 30.5 (NA) 40.0 143,960 182,000
Tennessee …….: 1,230 1,520 38.0 (NA) 48.0 46,740 72,960
Texas ………..: 110 90 26.0 (NA) 28.0 2,860 2,520
Virginia ……..: 580 590 42.0 (NA) 40.0 24,360 23,600
Wisconsin …….: 1,700 1,570 41.5 (NA) 40.0 70,550 62,800
:
Other States 1/ .: 40 51 44.0 (NA) 37.9 1,760 1,935
:
United States …: 76,164 75,688 39.8 (NA) 43.0 3,033,581 3,257,746
——————————————————————————————-
(NA) Not available.
1/ Other States include Florida and West Virginia. Individual State level estimates will
be published in the “Crop Production 2013 Summary.”

Cottonseed Production – United States: 2012 and Forecasted November 1, 2013
—————————————————————————–
: Production
State :———————————————————–
: 2012 : 2013 1/
—————————————————————————–
: 1,000 tons
:
United States …: 5,666.0 4,357.0
—————————————————————————–
1/ Based on a 3-year average lint-seed ratio.

Cotton Area Harvested, Yield, and Production by Type – States and United States: 2012 and
Forecasted November 1, 2013
——————————————————————————————–
: Area harvested : Yield per acre : Production 1/
:————————————————————————–
Type and State : : : : 2013 : :
: 2012 : 2013 : 2012 :———————–: 2012 : 2013
: : : : October 1 :November 1 : :
——————————————————————————————–
: — 1,000 acres — ———- pounds ———- 1,000 bales 2/
:
Upland :
Alabama ………: 378.0 363.0 946 (NA) 820 745.0 620.0
Arizona ………: 197.0 153.0 1,474 (NA) 1,475 605.0 470.0
Arkansas ……..: 585.0 300.0 1,064 (NA) 1,120 1,297.0 700.0
California ……: 141.0 92.0 1,729 (NA) 1,617 508.0 310.0
Florida ………: 107.0 123.0 897 (NA) 878 200.0 225.0
Georgia ………: 1,280.0 1,335.0 1,091 (NA) 899 2,910.0 2,500.0
Kansas ……….: 54.0 26.0 622 (NA) 628 70.0 34.0
Louisiana …….: 225.0 125.0 1,020 (NA) 1,306 478.0 340.0
Mississippi …..: 470.0 295.0 1,014 (NA) 1,090 993.0 670.0
Missouri ……..: 330.0 241.0 1,063 (NA) 1,046 731.0 525.0
:
New Mexico ……: 38.0 34.0 1,061 (NA) 1,200 84.0 85.0
North Carolina ..: 580.0 460.0 1,014 (NA) 793 1,225.0 760.0
Oklahoma ……..: 140.0 170.0 531 (NA) 565 155.0 200.0
South Carolina ..: 298.0 253.0 955 (NA) 664 593.0 350.0
Tennessee …….: 377.0 235.0 946 (NA) 878 743.0 430.0
Texas ………..: 3,850.0 3,300.0 623 (NA) 596 5,000.0 4,100.0
Virginia ……..: 85.0 77.0 1,118 (NA) 997 198.0 160.0
:
United States …: 9,135.0 7,582.0 869 (NA) 790 16,535.0 12,479.0
:
American Pima 3/ :
Arizona ………: 3.0 1.5 1,168 (NA) 800 7.3 2.5
California ……: 224.0 186.0 1,614 (NA) 1,548 753.0 600.0
New Mexico ……: 2.3 3.3 1,043 (NA) 1,018 5.0 7.0
Texas ………..: 7.5 8.0 928 (NA) 960 14.5 16.0
:
United States …: 236.8 198.8 1,581 (NA) 1,510 779.8 625.5
:
All :
Alabama ………: 378.0 363.0 946 (NA) 820 745.0 620.0
Arizona ………: 200.0 154.5 1,470 (NA) 1,468 612.3 472.5
Arkansas ……..: 585.0 300.0 1,064 (NA) 1,120 1,297.0 700.0
California ……: 365.0 278.0 1,658 (NA) 1,571 1,261.0 910.0
Florida ………: 107.0 123.0 897 (NA) 878 200.0 225.0
Georgia ………: 1,280.0 1,335.0 1,091 (NA) 899 2,910.0 2,500.0
Kansas ……….: 54.0 26.0 622 (NA) 628 70.0 34.0
Louisiana …….: 225.0 125.0 1,020 (NA) 1,306 478.0 340.0
Mississippi …..: 470.0 295.0 1,014 (NA) 1,090 993.0 670.0
Missouri ……..: 330.0 241.0 1,063 (NA) 1,046 731.0 525.0
:
New Mexico ……: 40.3 37.3 1,060 (NA) 1,184 89.0 92.0
North Carolina ..: 580.0 460.0 1,014 (NA) 793 1,225.0 760.0
Oklahoma ……..: 140.0 170.0 531 (NA) 565 155.0 200.0
South Carolina ..: 298.0 253.0 955 (NA) 664 593.0 350.0
Tennessee …….: 377.0 235.0 946 (NA) 878 743.0 430.0
Texas ………..: 3,857.5 3,308.0 624 (NA) 597 5,014.5 4,116.0
Virginia ……..: 85.0 77.0 1,118 (NA) 997 198.0 160.0
:
United States …: 9,371.8 7,780.8 887 (NA) 808 17,314.8 13,104.5
——————————————————————————————–
(NA) Not available.
1/ Production ginned and to be ginned.
2/ 480-pound net weight bale.
3/ Estimates for current year carried forward from an earlier forecast.

Peanut Area Planted and Harvested, Yield, and Production – States and
United States: 2012 and Forecasted November 1, 2013
——————————————————————————–
: Area planted : Area harvested
State :—————————————————————
: 2012 1/ : 2013 : 2012 1/ : 2013
——————————————————————————–
: 1,000 acres
:
Alabama ……..: 220.0 140.0 219.0 138.0
Florida ……..: 210.0 135.0 195.0 125.0
Georgia ……..: 735.0 430.0 730.0 425.0
Mississippi ….: 52.0 34.0 49.0 33.0
New Mexico …..: 10.0 6.0 10.0 6.0
North Carolina .: 107.0 81.0 106.0 80.0
Oklahoma …….: 24.0 18.0 22.0 17.0
South Carolina .: 110.0 81.0 107.0 77.0
Texas ……….: 150.0 117.0 146.0 113.0
Virginia …….: 20.0 16.0 20.0 16.0
:
United States ..: 1,638.0 1,058.0 1,604.0 1,030.0

——————————————————————————–
: Yield per acre : Production
State :—————————————————————
: : 2013 : :
: 2012 1/ :————————-: 2012 1/ : 2013
: : October 1 : November 1 : :
——————————————————————————–
: ———– pounds ———– —- 1,000 pounds —-
:
Alabama ……..: 4,000 (NA) 3,400 876,000 469,200
Florida ……..: 3,900 (NA) 3,600 760,500 450,000
Georgia ……..: 4,580 (NA) 4,150 3,343,400 1,763,750
Mississippi ….: 4,400 (NA) 3,200 215,600 105,600
New Mexico …..: 2,600 (NA) 3,200 26,000 19,200
North Carolina .: 4,100 (NA) 3,900 434,600 312,000
Oklahoma …….: 3,650 (NA) 3,800 80,300 64,600
South Carolina .: 3,900 (NA) 3,400 417,300 261,800
Texas ……….: 3,600 (NA) 3,500 525,600 395,500
Virginia …….: 4,200 (NA) 3,700 84,000 59,200
:
United States ..: 4,217 (NA) 3,787 6,763,300 3,900,850
——————————————————————————–
(NA) Not available.
1/ Revised.

Sugarbeet Area Harvested, Yield, and Production – States and United States: 2012 and
Forecasted November 1, 2013
[Relates to year of intended harvest in all States except California]
——————————————————————————————
: Area harvested : Yield per acre : Production
:—————————————————————————
State : : : : 2013 : :
: 2012 : 2013 : 2012 :————————-: 2012 : 2013
: : : : October 1 : November 1 : :
——————————————————————————————
: — 1,000 acres — ———— tons ———– — 1,000 tons —
:
California 1/ : 24.5 24.5 44.0 (NA) 45.0 1,078 1,103
Colorado …..: 29.7 25.7 31.8 (NA) 32.5 944 835
Idaho ……..: 182.0 174.0 35.3 (NA) 36.1 6,425 6,281
Michigan …..: 153.0 150.0 29.0 (NA) 25.0 4,437 3,750
Minnesota ….: 463.0 460.0 26.5 (NA) 25.0 12,270 11,500
Montana ……: 45.8 42.9 28.2 (NA) 29.4 1,292 1,261
Nebraska …..: 48.9 44.0 29.8 (NA) 29.8 1,457 1,311
North Dakota .: 215.0 223.0 28.0 (NA) 25.0 6,020 5,575
Oregon …….: 11.0 9.3 38.0 (NA) 35.9 418 334
Wyoming ……: 31.3 29.8 28.6 (NA) 29.6 895 882
:
United States : 1,204.2 1,183.2 29.3 (NA) 27.7 35,236 32,832
——————————————————————————————
(NA) Not available.
1/ Relates to year of intended harvest for fall planted beets in central California and
to year of planting for overwintered beets in central and southern California.

Sugarcane for Sugar and Seed Area Harvested, Yield, and Production – States and
United States: 2012 and Forecasted November 1, 2013
——————————————————————————————
: Area harvested : Yield per acre 1/ : Production 1/
:—————————————————————————
State : : : : 2013 : :
: 2012 : 2013 : 2012 :————————-: 2012 : 2013
: : : : October 1 : November 1 : :
——————————————————————————————
: 1,000 acres ———— tons ———– — 1,000 tons —
:
Florida ……: 413.0 413.0 36.9 (NA) 36.9 15,220 15,240
Hawaii …….: 17.4 17.5 75.1 (NA) 80.8 1,307 1,414
Louisiana ….: 428.0 440.0 33.0 (NA) 32.0 14,124 14,080
Texas ……..: 44.0 35.1 35.8 (NA) 38.1 1,576 1,337
:
United States : 902.4 905.6 35.7 (NA) 35.4 32,227 32,071
——————————————————————————————
(NA) Not available.
1/ Net tons.

Lentil Area Planted and Harvested, Yield, and Production – States and
United States: 2012 and Forecasted November 1, 2013
———————————————————————————-
: Area planted : Area harvested
State :——————————————————————-
: 2012 : 2013 : 2012 : 2013
———————————————————————————-
: 1,000 acres
:
Idaho ……..: 33.0 31.0 32.0 30.0
Montana ……: 205.0 120.0 195.0 115.0
North Dakota .: 160.0 129.0 158.0 126.0
Washington …: 65.0 60.0 65.0 60.0
:
United States : 463.0 340.0 450.0 331.0
———————————————————————————-
: Yield per acre : Production
State :——————————————————————-
: 2012 : 2013 : 2012 : 2013
———————————————————————————-
: ——- pounds ——- —— 1,000 cwt —–
:
Idaho ……..: 1,200 1,300 384 390
Montana ……: 1,100 1,800 2,145 2,070
North Dakota .: 1,220 900 1,928 1,134
Washington …: 1,300 1,300 845 780
:
United States : 1,178 1,321 5,302 4,374
———————————————————————————-

Dry Edible Pea Area Planted and Harvested, Yield, and Production – States and
United States: 2012 and Forecasted November 1, 2013
———————————————————————————-
: Area planted : Area harvested
State :——————————————————————-
: 2012 : 2013 : 2012 : 2013
———————————————————————————-
: 1,000 acres
:
Idaho ……..: 27.0 37.0 26.0 36.0
Montana ……: 315.0 420.0 293.0 380.0
North Dakota .: 235.0 295.0 230.0 280.0
Oregon …….: 7.0 8.0 7.0 7.0
Washington …: 65.0 80.0 65.0 79.0
:
United States : 649.0 840.0 621.0 782.0
———————————————————————————-
: Yield per acre : Production
State :——————————————————————-
: 2012 : 2013 : 2012 : 2013
———————————————————————————-
: ——- pounds ——- —— 1,000 cwt ——
:
Idaho ……..: 1,900 2,100 494 756
Montana ……: 1,500 1,900 4,395 7,220
North Dakota .: 1,950 2,050 4,485 5,740
Oregon …….: 2,830 2,100 198 147
Washington …: 2,000 2,200 1,300 1,738
:
United States : 1,751 1,995 10,872 15,601
———————————————————————————-

Austrian Winter Pea Area Planted and Harvested, Yield, and Production – States
and United States: 2012 and Forecasted November 1, 2013
———————————————————————————-
: Area planted : Area harvested
State :——————————————————————-
: 2012 : 2013 : 2012 : 2013
———————————————————————————-
: 1,000 acres
:
Idaho ……..: 5.5 6.0 4.5 5.0
Montana ……: 11.0 10.0 6.9 5.0
Oregon …….: 2.5 3.0 2.3 2.1
:
United States : 19.0 19.0 13.7 12.1
———————————————————————————-
: Yield per acre : Production
State :——————————————————————-
: 2012 : 2013 : 2012 : 2013
———————————————————————————-
: ——- pounds ——- —– 1,000 cwt —-
:
Idaho ……..: 1,300 1,600 59 80
Montana ……: 1,000 1,000 69 50
Oregon …….: 1,690 1,700 39 36
:
United States : 1,219 1,372 167 166
———————————————————————————-

Utilized Production of Citrus Fruits by Crop – States and United States: 2012-2013 and
Forecasted November 1, 2013
[The crop year begins with the bloom of the first year shown and ends with the completion of harvest the
following year]
————————————————————————————————————–
: Utilized production boxes 1/ : Utilized production ton equivalent
Crop and State :——————————————————————————-
: 2012-2013 : 2013-2014 : 2012-2013 : 2013-2014
————————————————————————————————————–
: ——- 1,000 boxes ——- ——- 1,000 tons ——
Oranges :
Early, mid, and Navel 2/ :
California ……………..: 44,000 44,000 1,760 1,760
Florida ………………..: 67,100 58,000 3,020 2,610
Texas ………………….: 1,499 1,400 64 60
:
United States …………..: 112,599 103,400 4,844 4,430
:
Valencia :
California ……………..: 12,500 12,500 500 500
Florida ………………..: 66,500 67,000 2,993 3,015
Texas ………………….: 289 364 12 15
:
United States …………..: 79,289 79,864 3,505 3,530
:
All :
California ……………..: 56,500 56,500 2,260 2,260
Florida ………………..: 133,600 125,000 6,013 5,625
Texas ………………….: 1,788 1,764 76 75
:
United States …………..: 191,888 183,264 8,349 7,960
:
Grapefruit :
White :
Florida ………………..: 5,250 4,800 223 204
:
Colored :
Florida ………………..: 13,100 13,000 557 553
:
All :
California ……………..: 4,000 4,000 160 160
Florida ………………..: 18,350 17,800 780 757
Texas ………………….: 6,100 5,190 244 208
:
United States …………..: 28,450 26,990 1,184 1,125
:
Tangerines and mandarins :
Arizona 3/ ……………….: 200 200 8 8
California 3/ …………….: 13,000 13,500 520 540
Florida ………………….: 3,280 3,750 156 178
:
United States …………….: 16,480 17,450 684 726
:
Lemons :
Arizona ………………….: 1,800 1,785 72 71
California ……………….: 21,000 21,500 840 860
:
United States …………….: 22,800 23,285 912 931
:
Tangelos :
Florida ………………….: 1,000 1,000 45 45
————————————————————————————————————–
1/ Net pounds per box: oranges in California-80, Florida-90, Texas-85; grapefruit in California-80,
Florida-85, Texas-80; tangerines and mandarins in Arizona and California-80, Florida-95; lemons-80;
tangelos-90.
2/ Navel and miscellaneous varieties in California. Early (including Navel) and midseason varieties in Florida
and Texas. Small quantities of tangerines in Texas and Temples in Florida.
3/ Includes tangelos and tangors.

Potato Area Planted and Harvested, Yield, and Production by Seasonal Group – States and
United States: 2012 and Forecasted November 1, 2013
———————————————————————————————
Seasonal group : Area planted : Area harvested :Yield per acre : Production
and State :———————————————————————
: 2012 : 2013 : 2012 : 2013 : 2012 : 2013 : 2012 : 2013
———————————————————————————————
:———– 1,000 acres ———- —- cwt — — 1,000 cwt —
:
Spring 1/ :
United States ………: 96.9 73.2 94.6 71.0 283 308 26,736 21,872
:
Summer 1/ :
United States ………: 49.8 47.0 48.5 45.7 373 358 18,067 16,369
:
Fall :
California …………: 8.3 8.3 8.3 8.3 470 485 3,901 4,026
Colorado …………..: 55.1 54.8 54.0 54.6 370 371 19,980 20,279
San Luis Valley ……: (NA) 49.7 (NA) 49.6 (NA) 365 (NA) 18,104
All other areas ……: (NA) 5.1 (NA) 5.0 (NA) 435 (NA) 2,175
Idaho ……………..: 345.0 317.0 344.0 316.0 412 421 141,820 132,925
10 Southwest counties : 20.0 17.0 20.0 17.0 530 520 10,600 8,840
Other Idaho counties .: 325.0 300.0 324.0 299.0 405 415 131,220 124,085
Maine ……………..: 57.5 54.5 57.0 53.0 275 295 15,675 15,635
Massachusetts ………: 3.9 3.7 3.9 3.7 330 260 1,287 962
Michigan …………..: 46.5 46.0 45.5 45.5 350 370 15,925 16,835
Minnesota ………….: 49.0 47.0 47.0 45.0 400 390 18,800 17,550
Montana ……………: 12.0 12.0 11.7 11.7 320 330 3,744 3,861
:
Nebraska …………..: 23.5 18.5 23.3 18.3 445 460 10,369 8,418
Nevada …………….: 7.1 (D) 7.1 (D) 380 (D) 2,698 (D)
New Mexico …………: 6.3 (D) 6.2 (D) 460 (D) 2,852 (D)
New York …………..: 17.0 20.0 16.5 19.5 285 275 4,703 5,363
North Dakota ……….: 88.0 81.0 84.0 78.0 300 290 25,200 22,620
Ohio ………………: 1.5 1.4 1.4 1.3 220 300 308 390
Oregon …………….: 42.0 40.0 41.7 39.6 550 545 22,935 21,582
Pennsylvania ……….: 8.9 8.4 8.6 8.2 260 285 2,236 2,337
Rhode Island ……….: 0.6 (D) 0.6 (D) 250 (D) 150 (D)
Washington …………: 165.0 160.0 164.0 160.0 585 600 95,940 96,000
Wisconsin ………….: 64.5 62.5 64.0 62.0 460 450 29,440 27,900
:
Other States 2/ …….: (NA) 12.1 (NA) 11.4 (NA) 423 (NA) 4,817
:
United States ………:1,001.7 947.2 988.8 936.1 423 429 417,963 401,500
:
All :
United States ………:1,148.4 1,067.4 1,131.9 1,052.8 409 418 462,766 439,741
———————————————————————————————
(D) Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual operations.
(NA) Not available.
1/ Estimates for current year carried forward from an earlier forecast.
2/ Includes data withheld above.

Fall Potato Varieties Planted

The National Agricultural Statistics Service collects variety data in seven
States, accounting for 80 percent of the 2013 United States fall potato
planted acres. The seven States conduct objective yield surveys where all
producing areas are sampled in proportion to planted acreage. Variety data
shown below are actual percentages from these surveys.

Percent of Fall Potatoes Planted to Major Varieties – Selected States: 2013 Crop
—————————————————————————————————
: Percent of :: : Percent of
State and variety : planted acres :: State and variety : planted acres
—————————————————————————————————
Idaho : :: North Dakota – continued :
Russet Burbank ………….: 52.4 :: Sangre …………………: 1.9
R Norkotah ……………..: 20.1 :: Shepody ………………..: 1.7
Ranger R ……………….: 14.3 :: Atlantic ……………….: 1.1
Alturas ………………..: 2.2 :: Other ………………….: 6.2
Frito Lay ………………: 1.0 :: :
Other ………………….: 10.0 :: Oregon :
: :: R Norkotah ……………..: 25.3
Maine : :: Ranger R ……………….: 16.2
Russet Burbank ………….: 39.5 :: Russet Burbank ………….: 14.2
Frito-Lay ………………: 15.2 :: Umatilla R ……………..: 10.4
Snowden ………………..: 5.9 :: Shepody ………………..: 6.8
Innovator ………………: 4.7 :: Frito-Lay ………………: 6.4
Superior ……………….: 4.0 :: Alturas ………………..: 6.4
Norland ………………..: 3.2 :: Yukon Gold ……………..: 2.8
Atlantic ……………….: 3.1 :: Premier R ………………: 2.2
Blazer R ……………….: 2.5 :: Modoc ………………….: 1.4
R Norkotah ……………..: 2.3 :: Pike …………………..: 1.1
Ontario ………………..: 2.0 :: Alpine …………………: 1.0
Norwis …………………: 1.7 :: Other ………………….: 5.8
Prospect ……………….: 1.5 :: :
Yukon Gold ……………..: 1.5 :: Washington :
Goldrush ……………….: 1.3 :: Russet Burbank ………….: 28.3
Reba …………………..: 1.1 :: Umatilla R ……………..: 17.3
Katahdin ……………….: 1.0 :: Ranger R ……………….: 12.2
Other ………………….: 9.5 :: R Norkotah ……………..: 11.5
: :: Alturas ………………..: 7.7
Minnesota : :: Chieftain ………………: 4.2
Russet Burbank ………….: 55.3 :: Frito-Lay ………………: 3.1
Norland ………………..: 18.6 :: Pike …………………..: 2.5
Umatilla R ……………..: 5.5 :: Clearwater ……………..: 1.8
Modoc ………………….: 2.3 :: Shepody ………………..: 1.6
Shepody ………………..: 2.3 :: Alpine …………………: 1.3
Dakota Pearl ……………: 1.8 :: Other ………………….: 8.5
Goldrush ……………….: 1.6 :: :
Alturas ………………..: 1.6 :: Wisconsin :
Dakota Rose …………….: 1.3 :: Frito-Lay ………………: 25.8
Alpine …………………: 1.3 :: Goldrush ……………….: 12.5
Cascade ………………..: 1.1 :: Russet Burbank ………….: 11.7
Other ………………….: 7.3 :: R Norkotah ……………..: 8.8
: :: Snowden ………………..: 7.6
North Dakota : :: Norland ………………..: 6.8
Russet Burbank ………….: 37.1 :: Silverton R …………….: 5.6
Prospect ……………….: 10.1 :: Umatilla R ……………..: 5.3
Norland ………………..: 8.1 :: Innovator ………………: 2.3
Umatilla R ……………..: 7.5 :: Atlantic ……………….: 1.9
Dakota Pearl ……………: 7.0 :: Superior ……………….: 1.7
Ranger R ……………….: 6.1 :: Mega Chip ………………: 1.6
Frito-Lay ………………: 4.8 :: Pike …………………..: 1.4
Bannock ………………..: 4.1 :: Ranger R ……………….: 1.0
Ivory Crisp …………….: 2.3 :: Other ………………….: 6.0
Red La Soda …………….: 2.0 :: :
—————————————————————————————————

Percent of Fall Potatoes Planted to Major Varieties – Seven-State Total: 2013 Crop
———————————————————————————————
: Percent of :: : Percent of
Variety : planted acres :: Variety : planted acres
———————————————————————————————
Russet Burbank ……….: 39.6 :: Silverton R ………….: 0.5
R Norkotah …………..: 12.9 :: Superior …………….: 0.4
Ranger R …………….: 10.1 :: Modoc ……………….: 0.4
Umatilla R …………..: 6.2 :: Cal White ……………: 0.3
Frito-Lay ……………: 5.0 :: Blazer R …………….: 0.3
Norland ……………..: 3.1 :: Red La Soda ………….: 0.3
Alturas ……………..: 3.0 :: Ivory Crisp ………….: 0.2
Chieftain ……………: 1.2 :: Cascade ……………..: 0.2
Snowden ……………..: 1.2 :: Premier ……………..: 0.2
Goldrush …………….: 1.2 :: Sangre ………………: 0.2
Prospect …………….: 1.2 :: La Chipper …………..: 0.2
Shepody ……………..: 1.1 :: Cal Red ……………..: 0.2
Dakota Pearl …………: 1.0 :: Bintje ………………: 0.2
Innovator ……………: 0.8 :: Satina ………………: 0.1
Pike ………………..: 0.7 :: Ontario ……………..: 0.1
Atlantic …………….: 0.6 :: Mega Chip ……………: 0.1
Yukon Gold …………..: 0.6 :: Norwis ………………: 0.1
Alpine ………………: 0.6 :: Dakota Crisp …………: 0.1
Bannock ……………..: 0.6 :: Western R ……………: 0.1
Clearwater …………..: 0.5 :: Other ……………….: 4.6
———————————————————————————————

Barley Area Planted and Harvested, Yield, and Production – Selected States and
United States: 2013
—————————————————————————————
State : Area planted : Area harvested : Yield per acre : Production
—————————————————————————————
: —– 1,000 acres —– bushels 1,000 bushels
:
Montana ………: 990 830 54.0 44,820
North Dakota ….: 760 720 64.0 46,080
:
United States …: 3,480 3,000 71.7 215,078
—————————————————————————————

Oat Area Planted and Harvested, Yield, and Production – Selected States and
United States: 2013
—————————————————————————————
State : Area planted : Area harvested : Yield per acre : Production
—————————————————————————————
: —– 1,000 acres —– bushels 1,000 bushels
:
Montana 1/ ……: 50 22 54.0 1,188
North Dakota ….: 225 135 62.0 8,370
:
United States 1/ : 3,010 1,030 64.0 65,879
—————————————————————————————
1/ Updated from “Small Grains 2013 Summary” released September 30, 2013.

All Wheat Area Planted and Harvested, Yield, and Production – Selected States and
United States: 2013
—————————————————————————————
State : Area planted : Area harvested : Yield per acre : Production
—————————————————————————————
: —– 1,000 acres —– bushels 1,000 bushels
:
Montana 1/ ……: 5,455 5,220 38.9 203,070
North Dakota 1/ .: 6,115 6,035 45.4 273,750
:
United States 1/ : 56,156 45,157 47.2 2,129,695
—————————————————————————————
1/ Updated from “Small Grains 2013 Summary” released September 30, 2013.

Durum Wheat Area Planted and Harvested, Yield, and Production – Selected States and
United States: 2013
—————————————————————————————
State : Area planted : Area harvested : Yield per acre : Production
—————————————————————————————
: —– 1,000 acres —– bushels 1,000 bushels
:
Montana ………: 505 490 34.0 16,660
North Dakota 1/ .: 795 770 38.5 29,645
:
United States 1/ : 1,470 1,421 43.6 61,913
—————————————————————————————
1/ Updated from “Small Grains 2013 Summary” released September 30, 2013.

Other Spring Wheat Area Planted and Harvested, Yield, and Production – Selected States
and United States: 2013
—————————————————————————————
State : Area planted : Area harvested : Yield per acre : Production
—————————————————————————————
: —– 1,000 acres —– bushels 1,000 bushels
:
Montana 1/ ……: 2,950 2,830 37.0 104,710
North Dakota 1/ .: 5,100 5,060 46.5 235,290
:
United States 1/ : 11,596 11,334 47.1 533,529
—————————————————————————————
1/ Updated from “Small Grains 2013 Summary” released September 30, 2013.

Wheat Production by Class – United States: 2011-2013
[Wheat class estimates are based on the latest available data including
both surveys and administrative data]
—————————————————————————
: : :
Crop : 2011 : 2012 : 2013 1/
—————————————————————————
: 1,000 bushels
:
Winter ….. :
Hard red ……: 780,089 1,000,005 744,029
Soft red ……: 457,535 419,801 564,907
Hard white ….: 12,368 13,171 11,154
Soft white ….: 243,685 208,295 214,163
:
Spring ….. :
Hard red ……: 397,689 504,520 490,394
Hard white ….: 11,878 8,465 10,502
Soft white ….: 45,621 28,974 32,633
Durum ………: 50,482 82,796 61,913
:
Total …… : 1,999,347 2,266,027 2,129,695
—————————————————————————
1/ Updated from “Small Grains 2013 Summary” released September 30, 2013.

Barley Stocks by Position – Selected States and United States: September 1, 2013
——————————————————————————–
State : On : Off : Total all
: farms : farms 1/ : positions
——————————————————————————–
: 1,000 bushels
:
Montana …………: 33,000 12,035 45,035
North Dakota …….: 30,000 21,905 51,905
:
United States ……: 105,600 90,844 196,444
——————————————————————————–
1/ Includes stocks at mills, elevators, warehouses, terminals, and processors.

Oat Stocks by Position – Selected States and United States: September 1, 2013
——————————————————————————–
State : On : Off : Total all
: farms : farms 1/ : positions
——————————————————————————–
: 1,000 bushels
:
Montana 2/ ………: 1,350 71 1,421
North Dakota …….: 5,700 512 6,212
:
United States 2/ …: 36,850 26,445 63,295
——————————————————————————–
1/ Includes stocks at mills, elevators, warehouses, terminals, and processors.
2/ Updated from “Grain Stocks” released September 30, 2013.

All Wheat Stocks by Position – Selected States and United States:
September 1, 2013
——————————————————————————–
State : On : Off : Total all
: farms : farms 1/ : positions
——————————————————————————–
: 1,000 bushels
:
Montana 2/ ………: 144,000 29,173 173,173
North Dakota 2/ ….: 158,000 60,434 218,434
:
United States 2/ …: 549,000 1,307,830 1,856,830
——————————————————————————–
1/ Includes stocks at mills, elevators, warehouses, terminals, and processors.
2/ Updated from “Grains Stocks” released September 30, 2013.

Durum Wheat Stocks by Position – Selected States and United States:
September 1, 2013
[Included in all wheat]
——————————————————————————–
State : On : Off : Total all
: farms : farms 1/ : positions
——————————————————————————–
: 1,000 bushels
:
Montana …………: 13,000 1,688 14,688
North Dakota 2/ ….: 29,000 5,347 34,347
:
United States 2/ …: 42,900 24,384 67,284
——————————————————————————–
1/ Includes stocks at mills, elevators, warehouses, terminals, and processors.
2/ Updated from “Grains Stocks” released September 30, 2013.

Crop Area Planted and Harvested, Yield, and Production in Domestic Units –
United States: 2012 and 2013
[Data are the latest estimates available, either from the current report or
from previous reports. Current year estimates are for the full 2013 crop year.
Blank data cells indicate estimation period has not yet begun]
——————————————————————————–
: Area planted : Area harvested
Crop :———————————————–
: 2012 : 2013 : 2012 : 2013
——————————————————————————–
: 1,000 acres
:
Grains and hay :
Barley …………………….: 3,637 3,480 3,244 3,000
Corn for grain 1/ …………..: 97,155 95,341 87,375 87,232
Corn for silage …………….: (NA) 7,379
Hay, all …………………..: (NA) (NA) 56,260 56,617
Alfalfa ………………….: (NA) (NA) 17,292 17,662
All other ………………..: (NA) (NA) 38,968 38,955
Oats ………………………: 2,760 3,010 1,045 1,030
Proso millet ……………….: 335 530 205
Rice ………………………: 2,699 2,485 2,678 2,464
Rye ……………………….: 1,300 1,446 248 278
Sorghum for grain 1/ ………..: 6,244 8,068 4,955 6,678
Sorghum for silage ………….: (NA) 363
Wheat, all …………………: 55,666 56,156 48,921 45,157
Winter …………………..: 41,224 43,090 34,734 32,402
Durum ……………………: 2,153 1,470 2,132 1,421
Other spring ……………..: 12,289 11,596 12,055 11,334
:
Oilseeds :
Canola …………………….: 1,765.0 1,369.0 1,729.0 1,284.5
Cottonseed …………………: (X) (X) (X) (X)
Flaxseed …………………..: 344 223 336 218
Mustard seed ……………….: 51.1 45.0 49.7 43.1
Peanuts ……………………: 1,638.0 1,058.0 1,604.0 1,030.0
Rapeseed …………………..: 2.2 1.5 2.1 1.4
Safflower ………………….: 169.8 151.0 160.1 144.5
Soybeans for beans ………….: 77,198 76,493 76,164 75,688
Sunflower ………………….: 1,919.0 1,578.5 1,841.0 1,495.5
:
Cotton, tobacco, and sugar crops:
Cotton, all ………………..: 12,314.4 10,337.0 9,371.8 7,780.8
Upland …………………..: 12,076.0 10,136.0 9,135.0 7,582.0
American Pima …………….: 238.4 201.0 236.8 198.8
Sugarbeets …………………: 1,230.1 1,207.3 1,204.2 1,183.2
Sugarcane ………………….: (NA) (NA) 902.4 905.6
Tobacco ……………………: (NA) (NA) 336.2 349.9
:
Dry beans, peas, and lentils :
Austrian winter peas ………..: 19.0 19.0 13.7 12.1
Dry edible beans ……………: 1,742.5 1,342.6 1,690.4 1,290.6
Dry edible peas …………….: 649.0 840.0 621.0 782.0
Lentils ……………………: 463.0 340.0 450.0 331.0
Wrinkled seed peas ………….: (NA) (NA)
:
Potatoes and miscellaneous :
Coffee (Hawaii) …………….: (NA) 6.3
Hops ………………………: (NA) (NA) 31.9 35.0
Peppermint oil ……………..: (NA) 76.0
Potatoes, all ………………: 1,148.4 1,067.4 1,131.9 1,052.8
Spring …………………..: 96.9 73.2 94.6 71.0
Summer …………………..: 49.8 47.0 48.5 45.7
Fall …………………….: 1,001.7 947.2 988.8 936.1
Spearmint oil ………………: (NA) 20.0
Sweet potatoes ……………..: 130.5 119.0 126.6 116.1
Taro (Hawaii) 2/ ……………: (NA) 0.4
——————————————————————————–
See footnote(s) at end of table. –continued

Crop Area Planted and Harvested, Yield, and Production in Domestic Units –
United States: 2012 and 2013 (continued)
[Data are the latest estimates available, either from the current report or from
previous reports. Current year estimates are for the full 2013 crop year. Blank data
cells indicate estimation period has not yet begun]
—————————————————————————————
: Yield per acre : Production
Crop :———————————————-
: 2012 : 2013 : 2012 : 2013
—————————————————————————————
: ——– 1,000 ——–
:
Grains and hay :
Barley ……………………..bushels: 67.9 71.7 220,284 215,078
Corn for grain ………………bushels: 123.4 160.4 10,780,296 13,988,720
Corn for silage ………………..tons: 15.4 113,450
Hay, all ………………………tons: 2.13 2.47 119,878 139,880
Alfalfa ……………………..tons: 3.01 3.39 52,049 59,926
All other ……………………tons: 1.74 2.05 67,829 79,954
Oats ……………………….bushels: 61.3 64.0 64,024 65,879
Proso millet ………………..bushels: 15.1 3,090
Rice 3/ ………………………..cwt: 7,449 7,660 199,479 188,734
Rye ………………………..bushels: 28.0 27.6 6,944 7,669
Sorghum for grain ……………bushels: 49.8 62.2 246,932 415,570
Sorghum for silage ……………..tons: 11.4 4,135
Wheat, all ………………….bushels: 46.3 47.2 2,266,027 2,129,695
Winter ……………………bushels: 47.3 47.4 1,641,272 1,534,253
Durum …………………….bushels: 38.8 43.6 82,796 61,913
Other spring ………………bushels: 45.0 47.1 541,959 533,529
:
Oilseeds :
Canola ………………………pounds: 1,416 2,447,410
Cottonseed …………………….tons: (X) (X) 5,666.0 4,357.0
Flaxseed ……………………bushels: 17.1 5,762
Mustard seed …………………pounds: 602 29,930
Peanuts ……………………..pounds: 4,217 3,787 6,763,300 3,900,850
Rapeseed …………………….pounds: 2,205 4,630
Safflower ……………………pounds: 1,121 179,424
Soybeans for beans …………..bushels: 39.8 43.0 3,033,581 3,257,746
Sunflower ……………………pounds: 1,513 2,785,695
:
Cotton, tobacco, and sugar crops :
Cotton, all 3/ ………………..bales: 887 808 17,314.8 13,104.5
Upland 3/ …………………..bales: 869 790 16,535.0 12,479.0
American Pima 3/ …………….bales: 1,581 1,510 779.8 625.5
Sugarbeets …………………….tons: 29.3 27.7 35,236 32,832
Sugarcane ……………………..tons: 35.7 35.4 32,227 32,071
Tobacco ……………………..pounds: 2,268 2,088 762,709 730,545
:
Dry beans, peas, and lentils :
Austrian winter peas 3/ ………….cwt: 1,219 1,372 167 166
Dry edible beans 3/ 4/ …………..cwt: 1,889 1,795 31,925 24,596
Dry edible peas 3/ ………………cwt: 1,751 1,995 10,872 15,601
Lentils 3/ ……………………..cwt: 1,178 1,321 5,302 4,374
Wrinkled seed peas ………………cwt: (NA) 406
:
Potatoes and miscellaneous :
Coffee (Hawaii) ………………pounds: 1,110 7,000
Hops ………………………..pounds: 1,918 61,249.2
Peppermint oil ……………….pounds: 87 6,605
Potatoes, all …………………..cwt: 409 418 462,766 439,741
Spring ……………………….cwt: 283 308 26,736 21,872
Summer ……………………….cwt: 373 358 18,067 16,369
Fall …………………………cwt: 423 429 417,963 401,500
Spearmint oil ………………..pounds: 120 2,390
Sweet potatoes ………………….cwt: 209 26,482
Taro (Hawaii) ………………..pounds: (NA) 3,500
—————————————————————————————
(NA) Not available.
(X) Not applicable.
1/ Area planted for all purposes.
2/ Area is total acres in crop, not harvested acres.
3/ Yield in pounds.
4/ Yield and production carried forward from August.

Crop Area Planted and Harvested, Yield, and Production in Metric Units –
United States: 2012 and 2013
[Data are the latest estimates available, either from the current report or
from previous reports. Current year estimates are for the full 2013 crop year.
Blank data cells indicate estimation period has not yet begun]
——————————————————————————–
: Area planted : Area harvested
Crop :———————————————–
: 2012 : 2013 : 2012 : 2013
——————————————————————————–
: hectares
:
Grains and hay :
Barley …………………….: 1,471,860 1,408,320 1,312,810 1,214,070
Corn for grain 1/ …………..:39,317,660 38,583,550 35,359,790 35,301,920
Corn for silage …………….: (NA) 2,986,210
Hay, all 2/ ………………..: (NA) (NA) 22,767,860 22,912,330
Alfalfa ………………….: (NA) (NA) 6,997,900 7,147,630
All other ………………..: (NA) (NA) 15,769,960 15,764,700
Oats ………………………: 1,116,940 1,218,120 422,900 416,830
Proso millet ……………….: 135,570 214,490 82,960
Rice ………………………: 1,092,260 (D) 1,083,760 997,160
Rye ……………………….: 526,100 585,180 100,360 112,500
Sorghum for grain 1/ ………..: 2,526,880 3,265,040 2,005,240 2,702,520
Sorghum for silage ………….: (NA) 146,900
Wheat, all 2/ ………………:22,527,470 22,725,770 19,797,840 18,274,590
Winter …………………..:16,682,940 17,438,090 14,056,500 13,112,770
Durum ……………………: 871,300 594,890 862,800 575,060
Other spring ……………..: 4,973,240 4,692,790 4,878,540 4,586,760
:
Oilseeds :
Canola …………………….: 714,280 554,020 699,710 519,820
Cottonseed …………………: (X) (X) (X) (X)
Flaxseed …………………..: 139,210 90,250 135,980 88,220
Mustard seed ……………….: 20,680 18,210 20,110 17,440
Peanuts ……………………: 662,880 428,160 649,120 416,830
Rapeseed …………………..: 890 610 850 570
Safflower ………………….: 68,720 61,110 64,790 58,480
Soybeans for beans ………….:31,241,260 30,955,950 30,822,810 30,630,180
Sunflower ………………….: 776,600 638,800 745,030 605,210
:
Cotton, tobacco, and sugar crops:
Cotton, all 2/ ……………..: 4,983,510 4,183,280 3,792,670 3,148,810
Upland …………………..: 4,887,040 4,101,940 3,696,840 3,068,360
American Pima …………….: 96,480 81,340 95,830 80,450
Sugarbeets …………………: 497,810 488,580 487,330 478,830
Sugarcane ………………….: (NA) (NA) 365,190 366,490
Tobacco ……………………: (NA) (NA) 136,070 141,580
:
Dry beans, peas, and lentils :
Austrian winter peas ………..: 7,690 7,690 5,540 4,900
Dry edible beans ……………: 705,170 543,340 684,090 522,290
Dry edible peas …………….: 262,640 339,940 251,310 316,470
Lentils ……………………: 187,370 137,590 182,110 133,950
Wrinkled seed peas ………….: (NA) (NA)
:
Potatoes and miscellaneous :
Coffee (Hawaii) …………….: (NA) 2,550
Hops ………………………: (NA) (NA) 12,920 14,180
Peppermint oil ……………..: (NA) 30,760
Potatoes, all 2/ ……………: 464,750 431,970 458,070 426,060
Spring …………………..: 39,210 29,620 38,280 28,730
Summer …………………..: 20,150 19,020 19,630 18,490
Fall …………………….: 405,380 383,320 400,160 378,830
Spearmint oil ………………: (NA) 8,090
Sweet potatoes ……………..: 52,810 48,160 51,230 46,980
Taro (Hawaii) 3/ ……………: (NA) 160
——————————————————————————–
See footnote(s) at end of table. –continued

Crop Area Planted and Harvested, Yield, and Production in Metric Units –
United States: 2012 and 2013 (continued)
[Data are the latest estimates available, either from the current report or
from previous reports. Current year estimates are for the full 2013 crop year.
Blank data cells indicate estimation period has not yet begun]
——————————————————————————–
: Yield per hectare : Production
Crop :———————————————–
: 2012 : 2013 : 2012 : 2013
——————————————————————————–
: metric tons
:
Grains and hay :
Barley …………………….: 3.65 3.86 4,796,120 4,682,770
Corn for grain ……………..: 7.74 10.07 273,832,130 355,329,850
Corn for silage …………….: 34.47 102,920,110
Hay, all 2/ ………………..: 4.78 5.54 108,751,490 126,897,000
Alfalfa ………………….: 6.75 7.61 47,218,060 54,363,950
All other ………………..: 3.90 4.60 61,533,430 72,533,050
Oats ………………………: 2.20 2.29 929,310 956,230
Proso millet ……………….: 0.84 70,080
Rice ………………………: 8.35 8.59 9,048,220 8,560,830
Rye ……………………….: 1.76 1.73 176,390 194,800
Sorghum for grain …………..: 3.13 3.91 6,272,360 10,555,960
Sorghum for silage ………….: 25.54 3,751,210
Wheat, all 2/ ………………: 3.12 3.17 61,671,150 57,960,800
Winter …………………..: 3.18 3.18 44,668,100 41,755,520
Durum ……………………: 2.61 2.93 2,253,340 1,685,000
Other spring ……………..: 3.02 3.17 14,749,710 14,520,280
:
Oilseeds :
Canola …………………….: 1.59 1,110,130
Cottonseed …………………: (X) (X) 5,140,110 3,952,600
Flaxseed …………………..: 1.08 146,360
Mustard seed ……………….: 0.67 13,580
Peanuts ……………………: 4.73 4.24 3,067,780 1,769,400
Rapeseed …………………..: 2.47 2,100
Safflower ………………….: 1.26 81,390
Soybeans for beans ………….: 2.68 2.89 82,560,550 88,661,320
Sunflower ………………….: 1.70 1,263,570
:
Cotton, tobacco, and sugar crops:
Cotton, all 2/ ……………..: 0.99 0.91 3,769,850 2,853,170
Upland …………………..: 0.97 0.89 3,600,070 2,716,980
American Pima …………….: 1.77 1.69 169,780 136,190
Sugarbeets …………………: 65.59 62.20 31,965,560 29,784,690
Sugarcane ………………….: 80.06 79.39 29,235,840 29,094,320
Tobacco ……………………: 2.54 2.34 345,960 331,370
:
Dry beans, peas, and lentils :
Austrian winter peas ………..: 1.37 1.54 7,570 7,530
Dry edible beans 4/ …………: 2.12 2.01 1,448,090 1,115,660
Dry edible peas …………….: 1.96 2.24 493,150 707,650
Lentils ……………………: 1.32 1.48 240,490 198,400
Wrinkled seed peas ………….: (NA) 18,420
:
Potatoes and miscellaneous :
Coffee (Hawaii) …………….: 1.25 3,180
Hops ………………………: 2.15 27,780
Peppermint oil ……………..: 0.10 3,000
Potatoes, all 2/ ……………: 45.82 46.82 20,990,710 19,946,320
Spring …………………..: 31.68 34.53 1,212,720 992,100
Summer …………………..: 41.75 40.15 819,510 742,490
Fall …………………….: 47.38 48.07 18,958,480 18,211,730
Spearmint oil ………………: 0.13 1,080
Sweet potatoes ……………..: 23.45 1,201,200
Taro (Hawaii) ………………: (NA) 1,590
——————————————————————————–
(NA) Not available.
(X) Not applicable.
1/ Area planted for all purposes.
2/ Total may not add due to rounding.
3/ Area is total hectares in crop, not harvested hectares.
4/ Yield and production carried forward from August.

Fruits and Nuts Production in Domestic Units – United States: 2013 and 2014
[Data are the latest estimates available, either from the current report or
from previous reports. Current year estimates are for the full 2013 crop year,
except citrus which is for the 2012-2013 season. Blank data cells indicate
estimation period has not yet begun]
——————————————————————————-
: Production
Crop :———————————–
: 2013 : 2014
——————————————————————————-
: 1,000
:
Citrus 1/ :
Grapefruit ……………………….tons: 1,184 1,125
Lemons …………………………..tons: 912 931
Oranges ………………………….tons: 8,349 7,960
Tangelos (Florida) ………………..tons: 45 45
Tangerines and mandarins …………..tons: 684 726
:
Noncitrus :
Apples ………………….. 1,000 pounds: 9,061.1
Apricots …………………………tons: 60.8
Bananas (Hawaii) ………………..pounds:
Grapes …………………………..tons: 7,343.4
Olives (California) ……………….tons: 160.0
Papayas (Hawaii) ………………..pounds:
Peaches ………………………….tons: 978.3
Pears ……………………………tons: 858.2
Prunes, dried (California) …………tons: 138.0
Prunes and plums (excludes California) tons: 13.2
:
Nuts and miscellaneous :
Almonds, shelled (California) …….pounds: 1,890,000 (NA)
Hazelnuts, in-shell (Oregon) ……….tons: 34.7
Pecans, in-shell ………………..pounds: 302,800
Walnuts, in-shell (California) ……..tons: 470 (NA)
Maple syrup ……………………gallons: 1,908 3,253
——————————————————————————-
(NA) Not available.
1/ Production years are 2012-2013 and 2013-2014.

Fruits and Nuts Production in Metric Units – United States: 2013 and 2014
[Data are the latest estimates available, either from the current report or
from previous reports. Current year estimates are for the full 2013 crop year,
except citrus which is for the 2012-2013 season. Blank data cells indicate
estimation period has not yet begun]
——————————————————————————-
: Production
Crop :———————————–
: 2013 : 2014
——————————————————————————-
: metric tons
:
Citrus 1/ :
Grapefruit …………………………..: 1,074,110 1,020,580
Lemons ………………………………: 827,350 844,590
Oranges ……………………………..: 7,574,090 2,118,280
Tangelos (Florida) ……………………: 40,820 40,820
Tangerines and mandarins ………………: 620,510 658,620
:
Noncitrus :
Apples ………………………………: 4,110,050
Apricots …………………………….: 55,160
Bananas (Hawaii) ……………………..:
Grapes ………………………………: 6,661,820
Olives (California) …………………..: 145,150
Papayas (Hawaii) ……………………..:
Peaches ……………………………..: 887,460
Pears ……………………………….: 778,580
Prunes, dried (California) …………….: 125,190
Prunes and plums (excludes California) ….: 12,010
:
Nuts and miscellaneous :
Almonds, shelled (California) ………….: 857,290 (NA)
Hazelnuts, in-shell (Oregon) …………..: 31,480
Pecans, in-shell ……………………..: 137,350
Walnuts, in-shell (California) …………: 426,380 (NA)
Maple syrup ………………………….: 9,540 16,260
——————————————————————————-
(NA) Not available.
1/ Production years are 2012-2013 and 2013-2014.

Corn for Grain Objective Yield Data

The National Agricultural Statistics Service is conducting objective yield
surveys in 10 corn-producing States during 2013. Randomly selected plots in
corn for grain fields are visited monthly from August through harvest to
obtain specific counts and measurements. Data in these tables are rounded
actual field counts from this survey.

Corn for Grain Plant Population per Acre – Selected States: 2009-2013
[Blank data cells indicate estimation period has not yet begun]
————————————————————————————————————————————-
State : : : : : :: State : : : : :
and month : 2009 : 2010 : 2011 : 2012 : 2013 :: and month : 2009 : 2010 : 2011 : 2012 : 2013
————————————————————————————————————————————-
: number :: : number
: :: :
Illinois : :: Nebraska :
September …..: 29,650 29,750 30,450 29,700 30,700 :: All corn :
October …….: 29,550 29,600 30,450 29,750 (NA) :: September ….: 25,700 25,700 25,400 26,150 26,000
November ……: 29,600 29,650 30,400 29,750 30,850 :: October ……: 25,700 25,600 25,400 26,150 (NA)
Final ………: 29,550 29,650 30,450 29,800 :: November …..: 25,700 25,550 25,450 26,150 26,100
: :: Final ……..: 25,750 25,550 25,450 26,150
Indiana : :: :
September …..: 28,350 28,300 29,200 29,250 30,250 :: Irrigated :
October …….: 28,400 28,350 29,200 29,200 (NA) :: September ….: 28,250 27,750 28,150 29,100 29,150
November ……: 28,350 28,350 29,150 29,200 30,400 :: October ……: 28,250 27,600 28,200 29,000 (NA)
Final ………: 28,350 28,350 29,150 29,200 :: November …..: 28,250 27,600 28,250 29,000 29,300
: :: Final ……..: 28,300 27,600 28,250 29,000
Iowa : :: :
September …..: 29,500 30,050 30,850 30,150 30,250 :: Non-irrigated :
October …….: 29,450 30,000 30,750 30,100 (NA) :: September ….: 21,750 22,350 21,250 21,600 21,000
November ……: 29,400 29,950 30,750 30,100 30,000 :: October ……: 21,700 22,350 21,200 21,850 (NA)
Final ………: 29,400 29,950 30,750 30,100 :: November …..: 21,700 22,300 21,200 21,850 21,050
: :: Final ……..: 21,700 22,300 21,200 21,850
Kansas : :: :
September …..: 22,650 21,850 21,500 23,050 22,900 :: Ohio :
October …….: 22,600 21,950 21,550 23,200 (NA) :: September …..: 28,300 28,400 29,550 29,200 28,800
November ……: 22,600 21,950 21,500 23,200 22,850 :: October …….: 28,450 28,200 29,350 29,100 (NA)
Final ………: 22,600 21,950 21,500 23,200 :: November ……: 28,200 28,200 29,350 29,100 28,700
: :: Final ………: 28,200 28,200 29,350 29,100
Minnesota : :: :
September …..: 30,800 29,850 30,250 30,000 31,350 :: South Dakota :
October …….: 30,600 29,750 30,200 30,000 (NA) :: September …..: 24,300 24,550 25,300 24,200 25,300
November ……: 30,600 29,900 30,250 30,000 30,950 :: October …….: 24,250 24,450 25,250 23,900 (NA)
Final ………: 30,600 29,900 30,250 30,000 :: November ……: 24,300 24,350 25,500 24,000 25,100
: :: Final ………: 24,300 24,350 25,500 24,000
Missouri : :: :
September …..: 25,700 25,700 25,850 26,650 27,700 :: Wisconsin :
October …….: 25,500 25,500 25,800 26,550 (NA) :: September …..: 28,150 28,600 29,000 29,000 29,050
November ……: 25,500 25,500 25,800 26,550 27,800 :: October …….: 28,150 28,300 28,900 28,550 (NA)
Final ………: 25,500 25,500 25,800 26,550 :: November ……: 27,700 28,300 28,950 28,600 29,150
: :: Final ………: 27,650 28,300 28,950 28,600
————————————————————————————————————————————-
(NA) Not available.

Corn for Grain Number of Ears per Acre – Selected States: 2009-2013
[Blank data cells indicate estimation period has not yet begun]
————————————————————————————————————————————-
State : : : : : :: State : : : : :
and month : 2009 : 2010 : 2011 : 2012 : 2013 :: and month : 2009 : 2010 : 2011 : 2012 : 2013
————————————————————————————————————————————-
: number :: : number
: :: :
Illinois : :: Nebraska :
September …..: 29,150 28,650 29,650 24,000 29,900 :: All corn :
October …….: 28,900 28,500 29,550 24,250 (NA) :: September ….: 25,650 25,250 24,500 24,500 26,050
November ……: 28,900 28,550 29,550 24,250 30,150 :: October ……: 25,650 25,250 24,350 24,050 (NA)
Final ………: 28,900 28,550 29,600 24,300 :: November …..: 25,600 25,100 24,350 24,050 25,700
: :: Final ……..: 25,650 25,100 24,350 24,050
Indiana : :: :
September …..: 27,950 27,900 27,950 26,500 29,850 :: Irrigated :
October …….: 28,100 27,750 27,800 26,150 (NA) :: September ….: 27,900 27,100 26,950 28,600 29,150
November ……: 28,000 27,750 27,750 26,150 29,750 :: October ……: 27,950 27,100 26,800 28,300 (NA)
Final ………: 27,950 27,750 27,750 26,150 :: November …..: 27,900 26,950 26,800 28,300 28,700
: :: Final ……..: 27,950 26,950 26,800 28,300
Iowa : :: :
September …..: 29,250 29,450 30,100 28,250 29,700 :: Non-irrigated :
October …….: 29,200 29,450 30,050 28,150 (NA) :: September ….: 22,100 22,350 20,800 18,250 21,200
November ……: 29,200 29,300 30,050 28,150 29,500 :: October ……: 22,050 22,250 20,650 17,600 (NA)
Final ………: 29,200 29,300 30,050 28,150 :: November …..: 22,000 22,200 20,650 17,550 20,950
: :: Final ……..: 22,000 22,200 20,650 17,550
Kansas : :: :
September …..: 22,750 21,250 20,900 20,350 22,500 :: Ohio :
October …….: 22,650 21,250 20,650 20,550 (NA) :: September …..: 27,700 27,700 28,700 27,700 28,350
November ……: 22,750 21,250 20,650 20,550 22,200 :: October …….: 27,950 27,650 28,950 27,150 (NA)
Final ………: 22,700 21,250 20,650 20,550 :: November ……: 27,650 27,650 29,150 27,100 28,200
: :: Final ………: 27,650 27,650 29,150 27,100
Minnesota : :: :
September …..: 30,250 29,750 29,750 29,450 30,750 :: South Dakota :
October …….: 30,750 29,600 29,300 29,400 (NA) :: September …..: 26,150 24,850 25,800 22,150 25,600
November ……: 30,800 29,700 29,350 29,400 30,850 :: October …….: 26,050 24,800 25,150 21,550 (NA)
Final ………: 30,800 29,700 29,350 29,400 :: November ……: 26,050 24,450 25,250 21,550 25,300
: :: Final ………: 26,050 24,450 25,250 21,550
Missouri : :: :
September …..: 24,800 25,100 24,600 23,050 26,950 :: Wisconsin :
October …….: 24,800 24,750 24,650 22,900 (NA) :: September …..: 27,500 28,700 28,650 27,650 28,900
November ……: 24,800 24,700 24,550 22,900 27,050 :: October …….: 28,850 28,500 28,650 27,300 (NA)
Final ………: 24,800 24,700 24,550 22,900 :: November ……: 28,150 28,550 28,650 27,100 28,900
: :: Final ………: 28,100 28,550 28,650 27,150
————————————————————————————————————————————-
(NA) Not available.

Corn Objective Yield Percent of Samples Processed in the Lab –
United States: 2009-2013
—————————————————————————
: October : November
Year :———————————————————–
:Dent stage 1/ : Mature 2/ :Dent stage 1/ : Mature 2/
—————————————————————————
: percent
:
2009 ……….: 40 31 3 91
2010 ……….: 7 82 (Z) 96
2011 ……….: 24 57 (Z) 94
2012 ……….: 3 90 (Z) 95
2013 ……….: (NA) (NA) (Z) 86
—————————————————————————
(NA) Not available.
(Z) Less than half of the unit shown.
1/ Includes corn in the dent stage of development. Ears are firm and
solid. Kernels fully dented with no milk present in most kernels.
2/ Includes that portion of the crop that is mature and ready for
harvest. No green foliage is present.

Corn for Grain Percentage Distribution by Plant Population Per Acre – Selected
States: 2009-2013
—————————————————————————————-
: Plant populations
State and year :———————————————————–
:Less than: 20,000- : 22,501- : 25,001- : 27,501- :More than
: 20,000 : 22,500 : 25,000 : 27,500 : 30,000 : 30,000
—————————————————————————————-
: Percent
:
Illinois ……………2009: 1.2 3.6 7.9 11.5 25.0 50.8
2010: 2.9 3.3 5.0 12.5 19.6 56.7
2011: 1.2 1.6 4.1 12.8 21.0 59.3
2012: 1.8 1.4 7.2 18.9 16.7 54.0
2013: 0.9 0.5 4.5 9.9 22.1 62.1
:
Indiana …………….2009: 4.6 3.3 7.9 19.7 31.6 32.9
2010: 8.1 6.6 4.4 16.9 23.5 40.5
2011: 7.4 2.9 4.4 14.0 24.3 47.0
2012: 4.6 2.3 6.9 20.6 16.0 49.6
2013: 2.7 2.7 6.3 8.0 26.8 53.5
:
Iowa ……………….2009: 3.1 3.8 6.5 9.2 28.5 48.9
2010: 1.2 3.8 6.5 8.8 21.9 57.8
2011: 2.0 0.8 2.8 9.8 19.3 65.3
2012: 1.2 2.0 3.2 10.9 25.4 57.3
2013: 0.9 2.8 4.2 11.7 25.4 55.0
:
Kansas ……………..2009: 31.4 19.6 9.8 9.8 18.6 10.8
2010: 32.0 18.0 11.0 13.0 14.0 12.0
2011: 33.3 12.5 18.8 9.4 13.5 12.5
2012: 22.9 14.1 17.4 13.0 17.4 15.2
2013: 30.6 10.9 12.9 14.9 17.8 12.9
:
Minnesota …………..2009: 0.6 2.4 1.8 6.6 23.4 65.2
2010: 2.0 2.0 4.6 12.6 21.2 57.6
2011: 2.7 4.1 6.2 8.2 15.1 63.7
2012: 1.3 6.6 4.6 8.6 19.1 59.8
2013: – 1.9 5.6 6.5 17.6 68.4
:
Missouri ……………2009: 10.8 14.2 17.5 27.5 14.2 15.8
2010: 14.2 8.0 19.5 22.1 23.8 12.4
2011: 12.5 8.9 24.1 17.9 19.6 17.0
2012: 6.7 7.7 15.4 26.0 28.8 15.4
2013: 1.8 8.3 14.7 24.8 28.4 22.0
:
Nebraska ……………2009: 15.4 12.3 15.4 14.5 19.7 22.7
2010: 17.0 8.5 15.5 21.5 19.5 18.0
2011: 17.5 7.0 12.5 15.5 34.0 13.5
2012: 12.9 7.3 13.5 15.2 23.6 27.5
2013: 15.9 10.1 10.6 19.0 20.1 24.3
:
Ohio ……………….2009: 3.8 3.8 9.6 19.2 32.8 30.8
2010: 4.8 3.8 11.4 11.4 32.4 36.2
2011: 1.9 1.0 8.6 23.8 21.0 43.7
2012: 2.8 2.8 6.4 21.1 22.0 44.9
2013: 3.4 3.4 4.5 25.8 29.2 33.7
:
South Dakota ………..2009: 18.9 6.6 25.4 20.8 17.9 10.4
2010: 15.9 15.0 23.3 21.5 15.0 9.3
2011: 15.5 10.7 17.5 20.4 17.5 18.4
2012: 17.3 21.4 17.3 20.0 16.0 8.0
2013: 11.8 10.5 23.7 27.7 14.5 11.8
:
Wisconsin …………..2009: 8.9 5.0 11.9 22.8 12.9 38.5
2010: 4.4 2.2 12.2 21.1 20.0 40.1
2011: 2.9 5.8 6.8 12.6 24.3 47.6
2012: 4.4 6.6 7.7 15.4 25.3 40.6
2013: 3.4 3.4 8.0 17.2 14.9 53.1
—————————————————————————————-
– Represents zero.
(D) Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual operations.
(NA) Not available.
(X) Not applicable.

Corn for Grain Frequency of Farmer Reported Row Widths – Selected States: 2009-2013
——————————————————————————————–
: Row width (inches)
State and year :—————————————————————
: Less than : : : : More than
: 30 : 30 : 36 : 38 : 38
——————————————————————————————–
: number
:
Illinois ……………2009: 6 239 7 3 –
2010: 5 239 6 1 –
2011: 8 231 8 – 1
2012: 5 227 2 1 –
2013: 10 210 7 2 –
:
Indiana …………….2009: 9 145 1 1 –
2010: 8 129 3 – –
2011: 5 128 2 2 –
2012: 8 128 4 2 –
2013: 5 122 1 3 1
:
Iowa ……………….2009: 5 246 12 8 1
2010: 10 232 8 11 –
2011: 7 233 6 12 –
2012: 8 238 7 7 –
2013: 9 214 5 8 –
:
Kansas ……………..2009: 1 108 – – –
2010: 4 101 2 1 –
2011: 3 97 – – –
2012: 4 94 – – –
2013: 2 105 – – –
:
Minnesota …………..2009: 33 139 3 3 –
2010: 23 125 5 – –
2011: 31 112 6 – –
2012: 33 111 9 3 –
2013: 35 104 3 1 –
:
Missouri ……………2009: 2 107 4 9 –
2010: 3 105 2 6 –
2011: 6 102 5 4 –
2012: 1 97 4 7 –
2013: 2 104 3 5 –
:
Nebraska ……………2009: 5 186 41 4 –
2010: 5 156 42 2 –
2011: 7 157 42 2 –
2012: 9 158 37 – –
2013: 3 169 29 1 –
:
Ohio ……………….2009: 1 109 1 – –
2010: 4 103 1 1 –
2011: 1 104 – 1 –
2012: 2 106 1 1 –
2013: 3 107 1 1 –
:
South Dakota ………..2009: 12 93 9 5 –
2010: 12 97 5 3 –
2011: 7 101 3 4 –
2012: 9 84 – 2 –
2013: 8 82 2 1 –
:
Wisconsin …………..2009: 3 94 7 9 1
2010: 1 88 4 9 –
2011: 5 103 2 4 –
2012: 5 93 5 5 –
2013: 8 91 4 2 –
——————————————————————————————–
– Represents zero.

Corn for Grain Percentage Distribution by Measured Row Width and Average Row Width – Selected
States: 2009-2013
———————————————————————————————-
: : Row width (inches) :
State and year :Samples :———————————————–:Average
: : 20.5 : 20.6- :30.6- :34.6- : 36.6- :38.6 or : row
: :or less : 30.5 : 34.5 : 36.5 : 38.5 :greater : width
———————————————————————————————-
: number —————– percent —————- inches
:
Illinois ……………2009: 252 1.2 84.5 9.5 2.0 2.8 – 30.2
2010: 240 1.3 84.0 11.7 1.7 1.3 – 30.2
2011: 243 3.3 84.8 7.8 3.3 0.8 – 30.0
2012: 222 3.2 86.8 8.6 – 0.5 0.9 29.8
2013: 222 3.6 81.4 12.6 1.4 0.5 0.5 29.9
:
Indiana …………….2009: 152 3.9 75.7 19.7 – 0.7 – 29.7
2010: 136 2.9 75.1 19.1 2.9 – – 29.9
2011: 136 2.2 78.7 17.6 – – 1.5 30.0
2012: 131 0.8 77.0 18.3 0.8 3.1 – 30.4
2013: 112 6.3 70.5 20.5 – 2.7 – 29.7
:
Iowa ……………….2009: 265 1.5 75.1 16.5 3.8 2.3 0.8 30.5
2010: 260 2.3 76.5 13.5 3.5 3.8 0.4 30.4
2011: 254 2.8 71.1 20.1 2.8 2.0 1.2 30.2
2012: 248 2.8 75.1 16.1 2.8 2.0 1.2 30.3
2013: 213 1.4 76.5 16.0 2.8 3.3 – 30.3
:
Kansas ……………..2009: 102 – 78.4 20.6 1.0 – – 30.3
2010: 100 1.0 72.0 26.0 1.0 – – 30.2
2011: 96 – 80.2 18.8 – – 1.0 30.4
2012: 92 4.3 87.0 7.6 – 1.1 – 29.7
2013: 101 – 81.2 17.8 1.0 – – 30.2
:
Minnesota …………..2009: 167 3.6 79.6 13.2 1.8 1.2 0.6 28.8
2010: 151 2.0 82.7 11.3 2.0 2.0 – 29.1
2011: 146 4.1 81.5 9.6 2.1 2.7 – 28.8
2012: 152 3.3 74.9 13.8 5.3 2.0 0.7 28.9
2013: 108 1.9 81.4 13.9 2.8 – – 28.6
:
Missouri ……………2009: 120 – 65.8 23.3 4.2 2.5 4.2 30.9
2010: 113 0.9 70.7 19.5 2.7 5.3 0.9 30.8
2011: 112 – 60.6 26.8 4.5 2.7 5.4 31.3
2012: 104 1.0 65.3 21.2 4.8 4.8 2.9 31.0
2013: 109 – 82.5 10.1 3.7 2.8 0.9 30.5
:
Nebraska ……………2009: 228 1.3 61.5 17.5 14.5 4.8 0.4 31.3
2010: 200 1.0 60.5 17.0 17.0 4.0 0.5 31.5
2011: 200 2.0 62.5 14.0 13.5 8.0 – 31.3
2012: 178 1.7 56.7 20.8 14.6 5.1 1.1 31.3
2013: 189 1.6 65.1 18.0 7.9 7.4 – 31.0
:
Ohio ……………….2009: 104 1.0 67.2 27.9 1.0 2.9 – 30.4
2010: 105 1.0 80.9 17.1 1.0 – – 30.0
2011: 105 – 77.1 20.0 1.0 1.9 – 30.2
2012: 109 1.8 77.1 20.2 – – 0.9 30.2
2013: 89 1.1 80.9 18.0 – – – 30.1
:
South Dakota ………..2009: 106 3.8 61.3 23.6 4.7 5.7 0.9 30.1
2010: 107 4.7 65.4 22.4 2.8 4.7 – 29.8
2011: 103 3.9 65.1 24.3 2.9 1.9 1.9 30.1
2012: 75 1.3 72.1 20.0 – 5.3 1.3 30.3
2013: 76 1.3 86.9 6.6 3.9 1.3 – 29.9
:
Wisconsin …………..2009: 101 2.0 60.3 22.8 4.0 5.9 5.0 31.1
2010: 90 3.3 69.0 14.4 3.3 6.7 3.3 30.6
2011: 103 5.8 70.9 18.4 – 3.9 1.0 29.6
2012: 91 4.4 64.8 19.8 3.3 5.5 2.2 30.4
2013: 87 4.6 64.5 26.4 3.4 1.1 – 30.1
———————————————————————————————-
– Represents zero.

Cotton Objective Yield Data

The National Agricultural Statistics Service conducted objective yield
surveys in six cotton-producing States during 2013. Randomly selected plots
in cotton fields are visited monthly from August through harvest to obtain
specific counts and measurements. Data in this table are actual field counts
from this survey.

Cotton Cumulative Boll Counts – Selected States: 2009-2013
[Includes small bolls (less than one inch in diameter), large unopened bolls
(at least one inch in diameter), open bolls, partially opened bolls, and burrs
per 40 feet of row. November, December, and Final exclude small bolls. Blank
data cells indicate estimation period has not yet begun]
——————————————————————————–
: : : : :
State and month : 2009 : 2010 : 2011 : 2012 : 2013
——————————————————————————–
: number
:
Arkansas :
September ……….: 1,051 911 901 841 1,025
October …………: 814 893 845 852 (NA)
November ………..: 803 897 867 856 855
December ………..: 794 894 868 856
Final …………..: 794 894 868 856
:
Georgia :
September ……….: 571 609 531 656 481
October …………: 731 606 577 646 (NA)
November ………..: 712 686 659 756 663
December ………..: 737 683 665 768
Final …………..: 740 683 666 768
:
Louisiana :
September ……….: 714 699 938 855 806
October …………: 792 755 948 880 (NA)
November ………..: 756 789 949 900 857
December ………..: 788 781 949 900
Final …………..: 788 781 949 900
:
Mississippi :
September ……….: 925 864 898 883 925
October …………: 833 773 848 855 (NA)
November ………..: 717 776 874 896 906
December ………..: 722 776 875 896
Final …………..: 722 776 875 892
:
North Carolina :
September ……….: 701 681 553 727 532
October …………: 730 675 610 739 (NA)
November ………..: 779 689 646 865 636
December ………..: 777 689 646 872
Final …………..: 777 689 646 872
:
Texas :
September ……….: 613 658 540 535 547
October …………: 522 534 478 443 (NA)
November ………..: 502 589 515 522 517
December ………..: 502 589 520 549
Final …………..: 502 589 520 552
——————————————————————————–
(NA) Not available.

Soybean Objective Yield Data

The National Agricultural Statistics Service is conducting objective yield
surveys in 11 soybean-producing States during 2013. Randomly selected plots
in soybean fields are visited monthly from August through harvest to obtain
specific counts and measurements. Data in these tables are actual field
counts from this survey.

Soybean Pods with Beans per 18 Square Feet – Selected States: 2009-2013
[Blank data cells indicate estimation period has not yet begun]
————————————————————————————————————————————-
State : : : : : :: State : : : : :
and month : 2009 : 2010 : 2011 : 2012 : 2013 :: and month : 2009 : 2010 : 2011 : 2012 : 2013
————————————————————————————————————————————-
: number :: : number
: :: :
Arkansas 1/ : :: Minnesota :
September …..: (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) (NA) :: September …..: 1,456 1,679 1,670 1,587 1,433
October …….: 1,785 1,591 1,434 1,574 (NA) :: October …….: 1,542 1,741 1,705 1,606 (NA)
November ……: 1,794 1,805 1,607 1,570 1,864 :: November ……: 1,611 1,783 1,678 1,605 1,400
Final ………: 1,865 1,833 1,597 1,590 :: Final ………: 1,581 1,783 1,678 1,614
: :: :
Illinois : :: Missouri :
September …..: 1,610 1,970 1,983 1,466 1,682 :: September …..: 1,856 1,924 1,957 1,347 1,528
October …….: 1,672 2,090 1,933 1,359 (NA) :: October …….: 1,983 1,899 1,781 1,205 (NA)
November ……: 1,676 2,096 1,931 1,382 1,713 :: November ……: 2,083 1,986 1,836 1,274 1,522
Final ………: 1,687 2,096 1,931 1,377 :: Final ………: 2,122 1,993 1,797 1,271
: :: :
Indiana : :: Nebraska :
September …..: 1,516 1,878 1,607 1,388 1,638 :: September …..: 1,793 1,906 2,032 1,406 1,671
October …….: 1,525 1,852 1,606 1,390 (NA) :: October …….: 1,878 2,109 2,075 1,509 (NA)
November ……: 1,583 1,879 1,635 1,396 1,696 :: November ……: 1,868 2,121 2,141 1,516 1,801
Final ………: 1,594 1,879 1,635 1,396 :: Final ………: 1,868 2,121 2,141 1,516
: :: :
Iowa : :: North Dakota :
September …..: 1,858 2,009 1,944 1,512 1,414 :: September …..: 1,208 1,375 1,337 1,308 1,275
October …….: 1,878 2,046 1,941 1,636 (NA) :: October …….: 1,236 1,416 1,382 1,326 (NA)
November ……: 1,868 2,054 1,996 1,630 1,538 :: November ……: 1,317 1,510 1,381 1,326 1,336
Final ………: 1,879 2,054 2,002 1,630 :: Final ………: 1,318 1,510 1,381 1,326
: :: :
Kansas : :: Ohio :
September …..: 1,627 1,402 1,488 1,038 1,295 :: September …..: 1,846 1,991 1,882 1,674 1,889
October …….: 1,759 1,392 1,466 1,039 (NA) :: October …….: 1,769 2,012 1,850 1,708 (NA)
November ……: 1,784 1,427 1,375 1,092 1,319 :: November ……: 1,757 2,022 1,893 1,747 1,780
Final ………: 1,768 1,429 1,375 1,092 :: Final ………: 1,712 2,022 1,892 1,746
: :: :
: :: South Dakota :
: :: September …..: 1,513 1,527 1,652 1,171 1,508
: :: October …….: 1,642 1,622 1,492 1,142 (NA)
: :: November ……: 1,683 1,605 1,530 1,127 1,543
: :: Final ………: 1,682 1,605 1,530 1,127
————————————————————————————————————————————-
(NA) Not available.
1/ September data not available due to plant immaturity.

Soybean Frequency of Farmer Reported Row Widths – Selected States: 2009-2013
——————————————————————————————–
: Row width (inches)
State and year :—————————————————————
: Less than : : : : More than
: 7.5 1/ : 7.5 : 15 : 30 : 30
——————————————————————————————–
: number
:
Arkansas ……………2009: 12 75 81 37 50
2010: 11 85 65 33 52
2011: 9 94 55 30 54
2012: 5 62 51 31 59
2013: 7 59 42 30 56
:
Illinois ……………2009: 7 30 110 65 –
2010: 3 30 109 64 1
2011: 3 20 110 62 3
2012: 6 20 112 58 3
2013: 3 18 91 63 –
:
Indiana …………….2009: 2 47 95 14 –
2010: 6 42 90 15 –
2011: 2 32 90 13 1
2012: 4 25 100 15 –
2013: 2 20 98 17 1
:
Iowa ……………….2009: 2 15 92 95 5
2010: 4 18 72 93 4
2011: 2 13 78 95 2
2012: 1 9 89 86 3
2013: 2 1 78 93 3
:
Kansas ……………..2009: 2 19 40 45 2
2010: 4 20 29 58 1
2011: 3 11 47 43 3
2012: 1 28 28 56 –
2013: 2 22 52 43 –
:
Minnesota …………..2009: 9 10 40 44 2
2010: 7 13 44 39 1
2011: 5 10 40 43 2
2012: 3 4 46 48 2
2013: 1 6 45 39 –
:
Missouri ……………2009: 3 14 68 19 6
2010: 6 14 79 11 5
2011: 2 14 68 20 9
2012: 2 14 78 21 10
2013: – 23 76 15 8
:
Nebraska ……………2009: – 11 32 45 12
2010: – 8 28 51 10
2011: – 6 50 32 6
2012: – 7 38 53 8
2013: – 9 36 51 9
——————————————————————————————–
See footnote(s) at end of table. –continued

Soybean Frequency of Farmer Reported Row Widths – Selected States: 2009-2013 (continued)
——————————————————————————————–
: Row width (inches)
State and year :—————————————————————
: Less than : : : : More than
: 7.5 1/ : 7.5 : 15 : 30 : 30
——————————————————————————————–
: number
:
North Dakota ………..2009: 14 17 57 19 1
2010: 12 16 72 14 1
2011: 9 18 66 11 1
2012: 4 17 74 16 –
2013: 6 10 51 20 1
:
Ohio ……………….2009: 4 79 49 6 –
2010: 3 55 76 6 –
2011: 5 55 54 4 –
2012: 6 58 66 6 1
2013: 8 60 70 3 1
:
South Dakota ………..2009: 3 14 47 42 7
2010: 2 7 39 50 2
2011: – 8 41 45 2
2012: 1 10 39 51 1
2013: 4 5 23 55 1
——————————————————————————————–
– Represents zero.
1/ Includes broadcast soybeans.

Soybean Objective Yield Percent of Samples Processed in the Lab –
United States: 2009-2013
—————————————————————————
: October : November
Year :———————————————————–
: Mature 1/ : Mature 1/
—————————————————————————
: percent
:
2009 ……….: 38 87
2010 ……….: 59 94
2011 ……….: 32 95
2012 ……….: 64 94
2013 ……….: (NA) 73
—————————————————————————
(NA) Not available.
1/ Includes soybeans with brown pods and are considered mature or almost
mature.

Soybean Percentage Distribution by Measured Row Width and Average Row Width – Selected
States: 2009-2013
——————————————————————————————-
: : Row width (inches) :
State and year :Samples :——————————————–:Average
: :10.0 or : 10.1- : 18.6- : 28.6- :34.6 or : row
: :less 1/ : 18.5 : 28.5 : 34.5 :greater :width 1/
——————————————————————————————-
: number —————- percent ————— inches
:
Arkansas ……………2009: 239 23.9 28.2 30.5 9.2 8.2 18.6
2010: 239 27.9 27.3 25.2 10.3 9.3 18.2
2011: 242 26.6 27.7 28.3 9.3 8.1 18.0
2012: 207 24.0 23.5 28.1 13.8 10.6 19.3
2013: 185 26.0 27.9 25.0 11.9 9.2 18.4
:
Illinois ……………2009: 211 15.9 52.1 4.3 27.7 – 18.6
2010: 204 14.2 52.7 3.4 28.9 0.8 19.0
2011: 198 10.6 52.0 3.6 32.3 1.5 19.8
2012: 197 11.7 50.7 5.9 30.8 0.5 19.3
2013: 178 11.5 51.4 3.1 34.0 – 19.7
:
Indiana …………….2009: 159 25.6 61.8 3.5 8.8 0.3 14.9
2010: 153 28.2 60.3 2.6 8.9 – 14.6
2011: 138 24.0 63.6 4.0 7.7 0.7 14.8
2012: 140 16.8 68.2 3.6 11.4 – 15.9
2013: 141 15.5 69.8 4.4 9.6 0.7 15.9
:
Iowa ……………….2009: 209 6.9 39.2 7.2 43.6 3.1 22.3
2010: 189 7.6 36.0 6.9 47.9 1.6 22.6
2011: 192 6.2 37.2 6.8 49.0 0.8 22.8
2012: 190 5.3 39.5 9.2 44.2 1.8 22.5
2013: 177 3.1 34.4 10.8 49.7 2.0 23.5
:
Kansas ……………..2009: 109 11.6 45.4 7.4 35.6 – 20.1
2010: 113 16.9 29.8 3.1 49.8 0.4 22.0
2011: 102 6.9 50.5 6.8 35.8 – 20.5
2012: 112 13.9 36.3 3.6 46.2 – 21.3
2013: 119 11.1 52.3 3.4 33.2 – 19.2
:
Minnesota …………..2009: 107 9.8 27.6 22.4 40.2 – 21.5
2010: 95 15.5 25.1 21.9 35.3 2.2 21.5
2011: 101 11.9 20.8 23.7 40.1 3.5 22.5
2012: 100 4.0 27.5 24.0 43.0 1.5 23.1
2013: 97 6.3 29.7 21.9 41.1 1.0 22.7
:
Missouri ……………2009: 114 12.7 61.4 6.6 14.9 4.4 18.0
2010: 118 14.5 66.4 6.8 7.2 5.1 17.0
2011: 108 13.0 57.7 4.2 17.7 7.4 18.9
2012: 122 7.8 62.5 5.8 16.5 7.4 19.2
2013: 120 14.2 62.5 2.5 15.0 5.8 17.9
:
Nebraska ……………2009: 100 6.0 35.7 7.5 37.7 13.1 23.4
2010: 97 4.7 31.8 4.7 47.4 11.4 24.8
2011: 94 3.2 48.7 8.1 33.0 7.0 22.0
2012: 104 4.3 33.2 7.7 48.1 6.7 24.1
2013: 104 4.4 32.5 4.4 51.0 7.7 24.4
——————————————————————————————-
See footnote(s) at end of table. –continued

Soybean Percentage Distribution by Measured Row Width and Average Row Width – Selected
States: 2009-2013 (continued)
——————————————————————————————-
: : Row width (inches) :
State and year :Samples :——————————————–:Average
: :10.0 or : 10.1- : 18.6- : 28.6- :34.6 or : row
: :less 1/ : 18.5 : 28.5 : 34.5 :greater :width 1/
——————————————————————————————-
: number ————— percent ————— inches
:
North Dakota ………..2009: 108 18.7 52.8 10.3 17.3 0.9 17.0
2010: 115 15.2 59.6 12.6 12.6 – 16.2
2011: 105 9.8 62.6 15.8 11.8 – 16.7
2012: 110 11.4 55.9 22.3 10.4 – 17.3
2013: 89 13.5 44.9 20.8 20.8 – 18.7
:
Ohio ……………….2009: 138 51.8 42.8 2.5 2.9 – 11.9
2010: 140 34.6 57.2 3.9 4.3 – 13.4
2011: 119 39.1 52.9 4.6 3.4 – 12.8
2012: 136 40.8 51.1 4.1 3.3 0.7 12.9
2013: 143 37.3 51.8 6.7 3.5 0.7 13.2
:
South Dakota ………..2009: 112 12.6 30.0 13.0 38.1 6.3 22.4
2010: 95 5.3 31.2 15.3 46.6 1.6 23.1
2011: 92 4.9 35.3 11.9 44.6 3.3 23.0
2012: 99 7.6 32.5 14.2 44.7 1.0 22.5
2013: 94 6.7 18.0 15.2 57.9 2.2 25.5
——————————————————————————————-
– Represents zero.
1/ Broadcast soybeans included as “10.0 inches or less” but excluded in computation of
average width.

2013 Potato Objective Yield Data

The National Agricultural Statistics Service is conducting objective yield
surveys in seven fall potato-producing States during 2013. Sample plots were
located in potato fields randomly selected using a scientifically designed
sampling procedure. Field workers recorded counts and measurements within the
field and then harvested six hills per sample. Potatoes were sent to
laboratories for sizing and grading according to accepted United States fresh
grading standards. Data in these tables are rounded actual field counts from
this survey.

Fall Potato Number of Hills by Type – Selected States: 2009-2013
———————————————————————————————
: Reds : Whites : Yellows : Russets
:——————————————————————-
State and year :Samples:Average :Samples:Average :Samples:Average :Samples:Average
: : number : : number : : number : : number
: :of hills: :of hills: :of hills: :of hills
: :per acre: :per acre: :per acre: :per acre
———————————————————————————————
: number
:
Idaho ……………2009: 5 17,938 9 12,142 (D) (D) 253 12,940
2010: 5 17,499 5 14,200 4 17,110 227 12,948
2011: 5 17,571 6 11,790 (D) (D) 209 12,906
2012: 6 18,368 5 12,828 3 13,110 197 12,615
2013: 7 12,944 6 12,565 (D) (D) 180 12,754
:
Maine ……………2009: 6 14,873 40 13,807 9 15,617 61 9,638
2010: 5 16,275 51 13,597 7 13,327 52 9,964
2011: 9 13,687 46 13,015 3 14,268 73 9,809
2012: 4 12,589 41 11,810 6 11,471 82 9,669
2013: 8 13,306 56 13,468 9 12,427 41 10,005
:
Minnesota ………..2009: 43 12,314 8 13,507 (D) (D) 89 13,446
2010: 37 12,112 10 12,048 3 9,405 85 12,123
2011: 40 12,356 7 11,755 (D) (D) 95 12,548
2012: 37 13,295 13 12,782 (D) (D) 88 11,659
2013: 33 13,150 9 11,666 – – 91 12,348
:
North Dakota ……..2009: 21 10,403 18 9,660 – – 87 12,166
2010: 13 11,523 36 11,490 – – 82 12,815
2011: 22 11,581 23 11,181 (D) (D) 90 12,931
2012: 12 11,920 29 11,818 (D) (D) 91 13,064
2013: 22 10,496 39 11,057 6 13,096 68 12,406
:
Oregon …………..2009: (D) (D) 22 13,575 (D) (D) 103 13,549
2010: 4 11,436 26 13,744 (D) (D) 102 13,229
2011: 4 11,998 25 12,986 5 12,275 98 12,570
2012: 6 12,430 20 11,944 3 10,692 83 12,626
2013: – – 15 12,823 (D) (D) 54 12,703
:
Washington ……….2009: 12 16,779 11 15,779 (D) (D) 142 14,612
2010: 7 17,257 13 15,710 3 15,369 125 14,968
2011: 7 16,378 7 15,172 3 15,148 108 15,258
2012: 8 21,307 10 14,424 5 19,354 111 14,638
2013: 4 29,430 12 15,693 3 17,934 78 15,306
:
Wisconsin ………..2009: 8 14,288 47 14,514 (D) (D) 66 12,678
2010: 10 13,115 46 14,884 – – 61 12,595
2011: 7 16,312 48 14,184 (D) (D) 50 12,597
2012: 8 15,843 43 15,000 (D) (D) 66 12,884
2013: 12 15,661 42 14,341 (D) (D) 48 12,465
———————————————————————————————
– Represents zero.
(D) Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual operations.

Fall Potato Harvest Loss by Type – Selected States: 2009-2013
————————————————————————————————–
State and year : Reds : Whites : Yellows : Russets : All types
————————————————————————————————–
: cwt per acre
:
Idaho ………………2009: (D) 17 (D) 27 26
2010: – (D) (D) 31 31
2011: – (D) – 29 30
2012: (D) (D) (D) 25 26
2013: (D) (D) – 26 26
:
Maine ………………2009: 25 25 13 23 23
2010: 14 27 – 38 31
2011: (D) 30 (D) 30 29
2012: (D) 31 (D) 24 26
2013: 13 (D) (D) (D) 15
:
Minnesota …………..2009: 12 17 15 23 20
2010: 14 (D) – 28 23
2011: 20 (D) – 29 26
2012: 9 14 – 31 24
2013: (D) – – 40 36
:
North Dakota ………..2009: 23 16 (D) 31 28
2010: (D) 28 – 38 34
2011: 18 17 – 38 31
2012: 17 39 – 50 43
2013: 20 34 (D) 56 41
:
Oregon ……………..2009: (D) 15 (D) 27 25
2010: – 9 – 15 14
2011: (D) 12 – 21 20
2012: (D) 22 – 19 19
2013: – (D) – 21 24
:
Washington ………….2009: (D) 15 (D) 26 25
2010: (D) (D) (D) 22 20
2011: (D) (D) – 20 20
2012: (D) (D) – 22 20
2013: (D) (D) – 17 16
:
Wisconsin …………..2009: 9 16 (D) 16 15
2010: (D) 8 – 11 9
2011: – 9 – 14 12
2012: 7 9 – 7 8
2013: (D) 37 (D) 14 23
————————————————————————————————–
– Represents zero.
(D) Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual operations.

Fall Potato Grading Categories by Type – Selected States: 2012 and 2013
[Gross yield basis. Totals may not add to 100 due to rounding]
—————————————————————————————-
: No. 1 : No. 2 or :
Type and State : 2 inch minimum 1/ : processing usable : Cull 2/
: :1 1/2 inch minimum 1/:
:—————————————————————–
: 2012 : 2013 : 2012 : 2013 : 2012 : 2013
—————————————————————————————-
: percent
:
Round red potatoes :
Minnesota …………: 62.7 78.9 27.3 14.0 10.0 7.1
North Dakota ………: 47.8 80.4 43.7 11.1 8.5 8.5
Wisconsin …………: 82.5 84.7 17.1 15.3 0.4 –
:
Round white potatoes :
Maine 3/ ………….: 83.5 75.8 7.6 18.3 8.9 5.9
North Dakota ………: 78.5 76.7 17.2 16.5 4.3 6.8
Oregon ……………: 86.6 92.9 12.6 5.3 0.8 1.8
Wisconsin …………: 89.3 87.6 10.6 12.2 0.1 0.2
:
All long potatoes 4/ :
Idaho 5/ ………….: 80.9 82.4 18.0 16.6 1.1 1.0
Maine 3/ ………….: 80.6 77.9 9.7 16.3 9.7 5.8
Minnesota …………: 58.9 71.7 29.3 22.2 11.8 6.1
North Dakota ………: 66.1 73.2 23.6 14.8 10.3 12.0
Oregon ……………: 84.3 82.7 14.6 16.3 1.1 1.0
Washington ………..: 82.5 78.2 16.7 20.8 0.8 1.0
Wisconsin …………: 82.5 86.1 17.1 13.8 0.4 0.1
—————————————————————————————-
– Represents zero.
1/ Potatoes which meet the requirements for United States #1 or #2, as stated in United
States Standards for Grades of Potatoes, United States Department of Agriculture,
Agricultural Marketing Service.
2/ Potatoes not meeting the requirements for United States #1 or #2, as stated in United
States Standards for Grades of Potatoes, United States Department of Agriculture,
Agricultural Marketing Service.
3/ Percent of net yield adjusted for field loss.
4/ Includes Russet, Shepody, Prospect, and Defender varieties unless otherwise
indicated.
5/ Russets only.

Round Potato Size Categories by Type – Selected States: 2012 and 2013
[Gross yield basis. Totals may not add to 100 due to rounding]
————————————————————————————-
: Inches
:————————————————————–
Year, type, and State: 1 1/2 : 1 7/8 : 2 : 2 1/4 : 2 1/2 : 3 1/2 :4 inches
: – : – : – : – : – : – :and over
: 1 7/8 : 2 : 2 1/4 : 2 1/2 : 3 1/2 : 4 :
————————————————————————————-
: percent
:
2012 :
Red potatoes :
Minnesota ……….: 7.4 5.9 15.4 23.4 47.0 0.9 –
North Dakota …….: 5.8 3.3 11.9 25.5 53.1 0.4 –
Wisconsin ……….: 7.3 6.1 13.5 23.7 48.6 0.8 –
:
White potatoes :
Maine 1/ ………..: 4.4 3.4 12.2 20.8 51.5 6.7 1.0
North Dakota …….: 8.1 6.1 17.1 21.6 45.0 2.1 –
Oregon ………….: 7.7 5.0 14.1 21.0 51.6 0.6 –
Wisconsin ……….: 4.2 3.8 11.6 17.4 61.3 1.4 0.3
:
:
:
2013 :
Red potatoes :
Minnesota ……….: 5.7 4.3 13.6 20.9 53.9 1.6 –
North Dakota …….: 5.1 3.3 11.6 18.3 59.4 2.3 –
Wisconsin ……….: 6.1 4.8 16.3 23.3 46.4 3.1 –
:
White potatoes :
Maine 1/ ………..: 4.8 4.5 13.8 21.0 53.2 2.7 –
North Dakota …….: 8.5 5.6 13.9 18.2 48.3 5.5 –
Oregon ………….: 2.7 2.5 10.3 16.7 66.5 1.3 –
Wisconsin ……….: 5.0 4.3 12.8 20.5 54.6 2.4 0.4
————————————————————————————-
– Represents zero.
1/ Percent of net yield adjusted for field loss.

Long Potato (Russet and Shepody) Size Categories – Maine: 2012 and 2013
[Percent of net yield – adjusted for field loss]
——————————————————————————–
: Inches : Ounces
:———————————————————————–
Year : 1 1/2 : 1 7/8 :2 inches: : : : : 14
: – : – : or : 6-8 : 8-10 : 10-12 : 12-14 : and
: 1 7/8 : 2 : 4-6 : : : : : over
——————————————————————————–
: percent
:
2012 …: – 6.1 36.7 20.2 15.3 8.9 5.8 7.0
:
2013 …: 6.9 6.4 32.5 20.9 14.7 11.9 4.4 2.3
——————————————————————————–
– Represents zero.

All Long Potato Size Categories – Selected States: 2012 and 2013
[Gross yield basis. Totals may not add to 100 due to rounding. Includes Russet, Shepody, Prospect, and Defender varieties]
—————————————————————————————————————————————–
: Inches : Ounces
:——————————————————————————————————————–
Year : 1 1/2 : 1 5/8 : 1 7/8 : 2 in. : : : : : : : : : 14
and State : – : – : – : or : 6 : 7 : 8 : 9 : 10 : 11 : 12 : 13 : and
: 1 5/8 : 1 7/8 : 2 : 4-6 : : : : : : : : : over
—————————————————————————————————————————————–
: %
:
2012 :
Idaho 1/ ………..: 1.3 5.3 4.2 23.1 9.5 8.9 7.9 6.9 6.2 5.3 4.2 3.3 13.9
Minnesota ……….: 2.5 10.1 6.5 31.6 9.7 9.6 7.4 5.9 3.9 3.8 2.2 1.6 5.2
North Dakota …….: 1.6 6.7 4.6 26.2 10.1 10.0 7.3 7.0 5.7 4.6 3.9 2.7 9.6
Oregon ………….: 1.2 3.9 3.6 23.3 10.1 9.8 8.3 7.9 5.7 5.1 5.0 3.4 12.7
Washington ………: 0.5 3.9 3.8 25.6 10.2 10.1 7.9 7.4 6.3 5.1 3.9 3.0 12.3
Wisconsin ……….: 0.7 5.9 6.2 24.1 10.4 9.6 9.1 7.4 5.2 4.6 3.2 3.0 10.6
:
:
:
2013 :
Idaho 1/ ………..: 1.2 5.5 3.9 22.5 9.7 9.5 7.9 7.2 6.1 5.1 3.4 3.2 14.8
Minnesota ……….: 2.0 10.2 8.3 34.2 10.0 8.9 6.2 5.4 4.4 2.8 2.3 1.6 3.7
North Dakota …….: 0.7 4.5 3.9 21.8 8.2 8.3 8.0 8.5 7.0 4.9 5.1 3.8 15.3
Oregon ………….: 0.8 4.5 4.1 21.8 9.4 8.3 7.5 8.2 7.2 5.1 4.0 3.6 15.5
Washington ………: 0.8 4.6 3.7 25.1 9.7 8.5 7.8 8.5 6.0 5.7 3.9 2.3 13.4
Wisconsin ……….: 0.4 5.6 5.6 30.3 9.9 9.8 7.3 7.1 5.8 3.9 3.4 2.3 8.6
—————————————————————————————————————————————–
1/ Russets only.

October Weather Summary

An early-month Black Hills blizzard-devastating to livestock-headlined an
active weather pattern across the north-central United States. A storm during
the first week of October, affected a multi-state area. Western South Dakota
was hit hardest and killed thousands of animals in the higher elevations. An
additional two storms in western South Dakota hampered recovery efforts due
to heavy rain and more snow.

Farther east, however, Midwestern producers had enough time between storms to
harvest nearly half (47 percent) of the United States and about two-thirds
(66 percent) of the soybeans during the 4-week period ending October 27.
Overall the United States harvest progress by October 27 was 59 percent for
corn and 77 percent for soybeans. Toward month’s end, the soybean harvest was
nearing completion in upper Midwestern States such as Nebraska (94 percent)
and Minnesota (91 percent), despite wetter-than-normal October conditions.

Most of the Plains received enough autumn moisture to promote winter wheat
emergence and establishment, leading to favorable early-season crop
conditions. Nearly two-thirds (61%) of the United States wheat was rated in
good to excellent condition on October 27, although pockets of dryness were a
concern on the southern High Plains.

Meanwhile, dry weather returned across much of the West during October,
following the previous month’s exceptional rainfall. Flood recovery efforts
proceeded in Colorado, while mild, dry conditions fostered Northwestern
winter wheat growth. In addition, dry weather favored fieldwork, including
cotton harvesting, in California and the Southwest.

Elsewhere, generally dry weather accompanied near- to above-normal
temperatures in the Southeastern and North Atlantic States, while a single,
slow-moving storm prior to midmonth triggered heavy rain in the Mid-Atlantic
region. Southeastern fieldwork included winter wheat planting and cotton,
peanut, and soybean harvesting.

October Agricultural Summary

Cooler than normal temperatures blanketed the western half of the United
States during October while near-normal temperatures covered the eastern half
of the country. Precipitation was above normal throughout the northern Great
Plains, western Corn Belt, western Ohio Valley, and east Texas. In some of
these areas, precipitation was over 300 percent of normal which resulted in
delays in crop harvest. By the end of the month, cooler and dryer weather
conditions promoted rapid fieldwork in the northern Great Plains and western
Corn Belt.

By September 29, sixty-three percent of the corn crop was mature,
30 percentage points behind last year and 7 percentage points behind the
5-year average. Five percent of Iowa’s corn crop had been harvested for at
this time, two weeks behind normal. Nationally, 12 percent of the crop was
harvested, 40 percentage points behind last year and 11 percentage points
behind the 5-year average. By the third week of the month, 94 percent of the
corn crop was mature, 6 percentage points behind last year and slightly
behind the 5-year average. Thirty-five percent of Iowa’s corn crop had been
harvested by October 20, fifteen percentage points behind normal. Nationally,
39 percent of the corn was harvested by the third week of the month,
46 percentage points behind last year and 14 percentage points behind the
5-year average. By November 3, seventy-three percent of the corn was
harvested, 22 percentage points behind last year but 2 percentage points
ahead of the 5-year.

Sixty-seven percent of the soybean crop was at or beyond the leaf-dropping
stage by September 29, sixteen percentage points behind last year and
7 percentage points behind the 5-year average. In Minnesota, 73 percent of
the crop was at or beyond the leaf-dropping stage at this time, an increase
of 27 percentage points from the previous week. Nationally, 11 percent of the
soybean crop was harvested by September 29, twenty-eight percentage points
behind last year and 9 percentage points behind the 5-year average.
Ninety-four percent of the crop was at or beyond the leaf-dropping stage by
October 20, four percentage points behind last year and 3 percentage points
behind the 5-year average. Nationally, 63 percent of the soybean crop was
harvested by the third week of the month, 16 percentage points behind last
year and 6 percentage points behind the 5-year average. Eighty-six percent of
the soybean crop was harvested by November 3, six percentage points behind
last year but slightly ahead of the 5-year average.

Nationwide, 59 percent of the cotton crop had open bolls by September 29,
eighteen percentage points behind last year and 12 percentage points behind
the 5-year average. Cotton in the Northern and Southern Plains of Texas
progressed but development remained slightly behind normal. By September 29,
seven percent of the cotton crop was harvested, 6 percentage points behind
last year and 7 percentage points behind the 5-year average. By the third
week of the month, 81 percent of the cotton crop had open bolls,
12 percentage points behind last year and 11 percentage points behind the
5-year average. By October 20, twenty-one percent of the cotton crop was
harvested, 15 percentage points behind last year and 13 percentage points
behind the 5-year average. By November 3, forty-three percent of the cotton
crop was harvested, 18 percentage points behind last year and 11 percentage
points behind the 5-year average. Overall, 43 percent of the cotton crop was
reported in good to excellent condition as of November 3.

By September 29, fifty-three percent of the sorghum crop had reached
maturity, 5 percentage points behind last year and 2 percentage points behind
the 5-year average. Nationally, 36 percent of the sorghum crop had been
harvested by this time, two percentage points behind last year but slightly
ahead of the 5-year average. By the third week of the month, 85 percent of
the crop had reached maturity, slightly behind last year but 2 percentage
points ahead of the 5-year average. Nationally, 54 percent of the sorghum
crop had been harvested by October 20, identical to last year but
2 percentage points ahead of the 5-year average. By November 3,
seventy-five percent of the sorghum crop had been harvested, 2 percentage
points behind last year but 6 percentage points ahead of the 5-year average.

By September 29, producers had sown 39 percent of the Nation’s intended
2014 winter wheat acreage, slightly ahead of last year’s pace but slightly
behind the 5-year average. Nationally, 12 percent of the winter wheat was
emerged by this time, identical to the same time last year but 3 percentage
points behind the 5-year average. By the third week of the month, producers
had sown 79 percent of the Nation’s intended 2014 acreage, slightly behind
last year’s pace but identical to the 5-year average. Nationally, 53 percent
of the winter wheat was emerged on October 20, five percentage points ahead
of last year but slightly behind the 5-year average. By November 3, producers
had sown 91 percent of the Nation’s intended 2014 acreage, identical to last
year’s pace but slightly ahead of the 5-year average. Nationally, 78 percent
of the winter wheat was emerged by month’s end, 6 percentage points ahead of
last year and 5 percentage points ahead of the 5-year average. Overall,
63 percent of the winter wheat crop was reported in good to excellent
condition as of November 3, twenty-four percentage points better than the
same time last year.

Fifty-eight percent of the Nation’s rice crop was harvested by September 29,
seventeen percentage points behind last year and 4 percentage points behind
the 5-year average. Eighty-eight percent of the Nation’s rice crop was
harvested by October 20, two percentage points behind last year but
2 percentage points ahead of the 5-year average. Ninety-eight percent of the
Nation’s rice crop was harvested by November 3, three percentage points ahead
of both last year and the 5-year average.

Producers had harvested 12 percent of the Nation’s peanut crop by
September 29, nine percentage points behind last year and 5 percentage points
behind the 5-year average. Fifty-seven percent of the Nation’s peanut crop
was harvested by October 20, six percentage points behind last year but
3 percentage points ahead of the 5-year average. By November 3,
eighty-four percent of the Nation’s peanut crop was harvested, 2 percentage
points behind last year but 6 percentage points ahead of the 5-year average.

By September 29, ten percent of the nation’s sugarbeet acreage had been
harvested, 8 percentage points behind the same time last year, and
4 percentage points behind the 5-year average. By the third week of the
month, 62 percent of the Nation’s sugarbeet acreage had been harvested,
9 percentage points behind the same time last year and 4 percentage points
behind the 5-year average. By November 3, ninety-three percent of the
Nation’s sugarbeet acreage had been harvested, 4 percentage points ahead of
last year and 3 percentage points ahead of the 5-year average.

Nationwide, 12 percent of the sunflower crop had been harvested by
October 20, fifty-seven percentage points behind last year and 20 percentage
points behind the 5-year average. By November 3, thirty-two percent of the
sunflower crop was harvested, 57 percentage points behind last year and
29 percentage points behind the 5-year average.

Crop Comments

Corn: Acreage updates were made in several States based on administrative
data. Total planted area, at 95.3 million acres is down 2 percent from the
previous estimate. Area harvested and to be harvested for grain is forecast
at 87.2 million acres, down 2 percent from the September forecast. Based on
conditions as of November 1, yields are expected to average 160.4 bushels per
acre. Record yields are forecast for eighteen States in 2013.

As of October 27, the last published corn condition ratings for 2013,
sixty-two percent of the corn acreage was rated in good to excellent
condition in the 18 major producing States.

The November 1 objective yield data indicate a record high number of ears per
acre for the combined 10 objective yield States (Iowa, Illinois, Indiana,
Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin).
Approximately 6 percent of the sample units laid out for 2013 were harvested
for grain by the producer before the current month’s observations could be
completed. This compares with the five-year average of 2 percent.

As October began, the corn crop continued to lag behind in development
compared with both last year and the 5-year average. On September 29,
sixty-three percent of the nation’s corn crop was mature, 30 percentage
points behind last year and 7 percentage points behind the 5-year average.
Wet weather across much of the corn belt affected harvest progress with only
12 percent of the crop harvested by the first of the month, 40 percentage
points behind last year’s drought affected crop and 11 percentage points
behind the 5-year average. However, by the third week of the month, the crop
began to make headway as 94 percent of the nation’s corn crop was mature,
slightly behind the 5-year average. Good harvest weather allowed producers to
harvest 73 percent of the corn crop by November 3, twenty-two percentage
points behind last year but 2 percentage points ahead of the 5-year average.

Sorghum: Production is forecast at 416 million bushels, up 5 percent from the
September forecast and up 68 percent from last year. Acreage updates were
made in several States based on administrative data. Planted area, at 8.07
million acres, is up 12 percent from the previous estimate and up 29 percent
from last year. Area harvested for grain is forecast at 6.68 million acres,
up 10 percent from September and up 35 percent from 2012. Based on November 1
conditions, yield is forecast at 62.2 bushels per acre, down 2.9 bushels from
the September forecast but up 12.4 bushels from last year. Record high yields
are forecast in Louisiana and South Dakota, where farmers reported mostly
favorable growing conditions.

As of November 3, seventy-five percent of the sorghum crop had been
harvested, 2 percentage points behind last year but 6 percentage points ahead
of the 5-year average.

Rice: Production is forecast at 189 million cwt, up 2 percent from the
September forecast but down 5 percent from last year. Area for harvest is
expected to total 2.46 million acres, unchanged from September but 8 percent
lower than 2012. Based on conditions as of November 1, the average United
States yield is forecast at a record high 7,660 pounds per acre, up
149 pounds from September and up 211 pounds from last year. Record high
yields are forecast in Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi.

By November 3, rice harvest was 98 percent complete, 3 percentage points
ahead of both last year and the 5- year average. Rice harvest was complete in
Texas, Mississippi, and Louisiana at this time.

Soybeans: Acreage updates were made in several States based on administrative
data. Planted area, at 76.5 million acres, is down 1 percent from the
previous estimate. Area for harvest is forecast at 75.7 million acres, down
1 percent from both the previous forecast and last year.

The November objective yield data for the combined 11 major soybean-producing
States (Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri,
Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, and South Dakota) indicate a higher pod count
compared with last year as conditions have generally been more favorable
across the Midwest. Compared with final counts for 2012, pod counts are up in
nine of the eleven published States. The largest increase from 2012’s final
pod count is expected in South Dakota, up 416 pods per 18 square feet.
Increases of more than 200 pods per 18 square feet are also expected in
Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Missouri, and Nebraska. Approximately
14 percent of the sample units laid out for 2013 were harvested for beans by
the producer before the current month’s observations could be completed. This
compares with the five-year average of 3 percent.

Soybean harvest in the 18 major States was 11 percent complete at the end of
September, 28 percentage points behind last year’s pace and 9 percentage
points behind normal. Progress was behind normal in all 18 States except for
Arkansas, Louisiana, and Ohio. During the month of October, conditions
allowed progress to advance enough to reach the normal pace. As of
November 3, eighty-six percent of the crop was harvested, 6 percentage points
behind last year’s pace but 1 percentage point ahead of normal. Only
Kentucky and Tennessee were behind normal by more than 10 percentage points.

If realized, the forecasted yield will be a record high in Arkansas, Georgia,
Kentucky, Louisiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Tennessee.

Cotton: Upland harvested area is expected to total 7.58 million acres,
unchanged from the previous forecast but down 17 percent from 2012. Pima
harvested area, at 198,800 acres, was carried forward from the previous
forecast.

As of November 3, forty-three percent of the cotton had been harvested,
compared with 61 percent at this time last year. Ninety-five percent of the
crop had bolls opening by November 3, three percentage points behind last
year and two percentage points behind the 5-year average.

Harvesting activities progressed in the Southeast throughout the month.
Record high yields are forecast in Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, and New
Mexico.

Ginnings totaled 3,172,650 running bales on November 1, 2013, compared with
6,433,750 running bales ginned the same date last year.

Peanuts: Production is forecast at 3.90 billion pounds, up 5 percent from the
September forecast but down 42 percent from last year’s revised production of
6.76 billion pounds. Area for harvest is expected to total 1.03 million
acres, unchanged from September but 36 percent lower than 2012. Based on
conditions as of November 1, the average yield for the United States is
forecast at 3,787 pounds per acre, up 184 pounds from September but down 430
pounds from the record high set last year. Oklahoma is the only State
expecting a record high yield in 2013.

As of November 3, eighty-four percent of the United States acreage was
harvested, 2 percentage points behind last year but 6 percentage points ahead
of the 5-year average. Weather conditions were ideal for peanut harvesting
during October in most peanut-producing regions.

Sunflower: Area planted, at 1.58 million acres, is up less than 1 percent
from the June estimate but down 18 percent from last year. This is the second
lowest planted area since 1976. Sunflower growers expect to harvest
1.50 million acres, down slightly from June and down 19 percent from 2012. If
realized, harvested area will also be the second lowest since 1976.

No revisions were made to the 2012 sunflower acreage, yield, and production
estimates.

Canola: Area planted, at 1.37 million acres, is up 5 percent from the June
estimate but down 22 percent from last year’s record high. Canola farmers
expect to harvest 1.28 million acres, up 2 percent from June but down
26 percent from 2012. Despite the large decline from last year’s record high,
harvested area will be the third largest since 2002, if realized.

Dry beans: United States dry edible beans revised planted area is estimated
at 1.34 million acres, down 23 percent from the previous year. Harvested area
is forecast at 1.29 million acres, down 24 percent from 2012. Wetter than
normal conditions delayed or prohibited planting in several northern States.

Sugarbeets: Production of sugarbeets for the 2013 crop year is forecast at
32.8 million tons, down 7 percent from last year. Producers expect to harvest
1.18 million acres, unchanged from the previous forecast but down 2 percent
from 2012. Expected yield is forecast at 27.7 tons per acre, a decrease of
1.6 tons from last year.

Sugarcane: Production of sugarcane for sugar and seed in 2013 is forecast at
32.1 million tons, down slightly from last year. Producers intend to harvest
905,600 acres for sugar and seed during the 2013 crop year, up 3,200 acres
from last year. Expected yield for sugar and seed is forecast at 35.4 tons
per acre, down slightly from 2012.

Lentils: Production of lentils is forecast at 4.37 million cwt, down
18 percent from last year. Area for harvest is forecast at 331,000 acres,
down 26 percent from the previous year. Average yield is expected to be 1,321
pounds per acre, up 143 pounds from 2012.

In North Dakota, planting began in early-May, about three weeks behind last
year’s pace due to wintry conditions. Planting was complete by mid-July,
about 6 weeks behind 2012. Harvest started in mid-September and was
essentially finished by October 20, about three weeks behind the average
pace. In Montana, cooler wet spring conditions delayed planting and crop
development remained behind a normal pace.

Dry edible peas: Production of dry edible peas is forecast at 15.6 million
cwt, up 43 percent from last year. Planted area, at 840,000 acres, and
harvested area, at 782,000 acres, increased by 29 percent and 26 percent,
respectively. Average yield is expected to be 1,995 pounds per acre, up
244 pounds from 2012.

In Montana, producers began harvest in late-July and were finished by
mid-September. In North Dakota, planting was 95 percent complete by June 30.
Harvest started in early-August and was 97 percent finished by the week
ending September 15. Crop condition was rated mostly fair to good throughout
the entire growing season.

Austrian winter peas: Planted area is estimated at 19,000 acres, unchanged
from last year. Area harvested is expected to total 12,100 acres, down
12 percent from last year. Yield, at 1,372 pounds, is up 153 cwt from last
season. Production, at 166,000 cwt, is down 1 percent from 2012.

Small grains: Survey respondents who reported barley, oats, Durum wheat, or
other spring wheat acreage as not yet harvested in Montana and North Dakota
during the surveys conducted in preparation for the Small Grains 2013 Summary
were re-contacted in late October to determine how many of the acres were
actually harvested and record the actual production from those acres. Based
on this updated information, several changes were made to the estimates
published in the Small Grains 2013 Summary. Because unharvested production is
a component of on-farm stocks, changes were made to the September 1 on-farm
stocks levels comparable with the production adjustments.

Other spring wheat harvested area was reduced from the Small Grains
2013 Summary in Montana. As a result of this change and a yield change in
North Dakota, other spring wheat production in the United States is estimated
at 534 million bushels, up slightly from the Small Grains 2013 Summary.

Durum harvested area was unchanged from the Small Grains 2013 Summary. As a
result of a yield change in North Dakota, Durum wheat production in the
United States is estimated at 61.9 million bushels, up slightly from the
Small Grains 2013 Summary.

All wheat production in the United States is estimated at 2.13 billion
bushels, up slightly from the Small Grains 2013 Summary.

Oat harvested area and yield were reduced from the Small Grains 2013 Summary
in Montana. As a result of these changes, oat production in the United States
is estimated at 65.9 million bushels, down slightly from the Small Grains
2013 Summary.

Barley harvested area, yield, and production were unchanged from the Small
Grains 2013 Summary.

Grapefruit: The 2013-2014 United States grapefruit crop is forecast at
1.13 million tons, down 5 percent from last season’s final utilization. In
Florida, fruit per tree is forecast to be higher than previous season.
However, projected droppage is expected to be above average, while average
size is expected to be below the minimum for white grapefruit and close to
the minimum for colored grapefruit.

Lemons: The forecast for the 2013-2014 United States lemon crop is
931,000 tons, up 2 percent from last season’s final utilization. In
California, the lemon harvest is progressing ahead of normal. Demand,
especially for export, continues to be excellent. In Arizona, the quality of
lemons is reportedly fair while demand continues to exceed supply.

Tangelos: Florida’s tangelo forecast is 1.00 million boxes (45,000 tons),
unchanged from last season’s final utilization. The forecasted fruit per tree
is up from last year. Fruit size is expected to be near the minimum with
droppage projected to be above average.

Tangerines and mandarins: The United States tangerine and mandarin crop is
forecast at 726,000 tons, up 6 percent from the 2012-2013 crop. In
California, satsuma mandarin and tangerine harvests remained active. In
Florida, fruit per tree is forecast to be higher than last season. Fruit size
is projected to be above average for the Fallglo variety, near the minimum
for the Sunburst variety, and below average for the Honey variety. Droppage
is expected to be above average for the Sunburst and Honey varieties, but
average for the Fallglo variety.

Florida citrus: High temperatures for the month ranged from the mid 90s to
the mid to upper 80s by month’s end. Rainfall was scattered and generally
light as the dry season began. The citrus producing regions remained drought
free until the last week of the month, when abnormally dry conditions were
observed in all but the western area. Field workers reported that trees and
fruit in cared-for-groves look very good due to rainfall over the past
months. Fruit size reports appear to be inconsistent with some areas
reporting oranges slightly larger than golf balls and others closer to
baseball size. Grapefruit size was reported as larger than oranges. Grove
activity included resetting of new trees in active groves, pushing of dead
groves and replanting new citrus, mowing, fertilizing, and psyllid control.
About 70 percent of the packinghouses have opened and began shipping small
quantities of fruit. Only seven out of nineteen processing plants were
reported open so far this season.

California citrus: Satsuma mandarin and tangerine harvests remained active.
Navel orange harvest increased and maturity tests looked good. Lemon harvest
was ongoing in the Imperial and San Joaquin Valleys. Oroblanco grapefruit and
pomelo harvests continued. Quarantines were ongoing in Tulare County for
Asian Citrus Psyllid.

California noncitrus fruits and nuts: Harvested fruit orchards and vineyards
were irrigated and pruned. Fig harvest was complete. Pomegranate harvest
continued. Pear harvest was nearly complete and Asian pear harvest continued.
Apple harvest remained active, including the Fuji, Granny Smith, and Pink
Lady varieties. Kiwi and persimmon harvests began. Peach, nectarine, and plum
harvests were complete, except for some late variety plums. Stone fruit
orchards that had completed harvest were undergoing pruning, topping, and
general orchard cleanup. Olive harvest was ongoing for both oil and table
varieties. Avocado harvest was drawing to a close. Raisin grape harvest was
nearly complete. Late variety wine and table grapes continued to be
harvested. Almond harvest was nearly complete. Pistachio and walnut harvests
were slowing. Harvested nut orchards were irrigated, fertilized, and pruned.

Fall potatoes: Production of fall potatoes for 2013 is forecast at
402 million cwt, down 4 percent from last year. Area harvested, at
936,100 acres, is 5 percent below the previous year. The average yield
forecast, at 429 cwt per acre, is up 6 cwt from last year’s yield.

In Idaho, growers are expecting a record high yield, while harvested acreage
is estimated to be 8 percent lower than 2012. Growers in Maine reported
excessive moisture that stressed the developing crop and led to storage
problems. In New York, growers reported harvest losses due to excessively wet
conditions.

All potatoes: Total United States potato production in 2013 from all seasons
is forecast at 440 million cwt, 5 percent below 2012. Harvested area, at
1.05 million acres, is down 7 percent from last year. Average yield is
forecast at 418 cwt per acre, up 9 cwt from the previous year.

Statistical Methodology

Survey procedures: Objective yield and farm operator surveys were conducted
between October 25 and November 5 to gather information on expected yield as
of November 1. The objective yield surveys for corn, cotton, and soybeans
were conducted in the major producing States that usually account for about
80 percent of the United States production. Randomly selected plots were
revisited to make current counts. The counts made within each sample plot
depend on the crop and the maturity of that crop. In all cases, plant counts
are recorded along with other measurements that provide information to
forecast the number of ears, bolls, or pods and their weight. The counts are
used with similar data from previous years to develop a projected biological
yield. The average harvesting loss is subtracted to obtain a net yield. The
plots are revisited each month until crop maturity when the fruit is
harvested and weighed. After the farm operator has harvested the sample
field, another plot is sampled to obtain current year harvesting loss.

The farm operator survey was conducted primarily by telephone with some use
of mail, internet, and personal interviewers. Approximately 10,000 producers
were interviewed during the survey period and asked questions about probable
yield.

Estimating procedures: National and State level objective yield and grower
reported data were reviewed for reasonableness and consistency with
historical estimates. The survey data were also reviewed considering weather
patterns and crop progress compared to previous months and previous years.
Each State Field Office submits their analysis of the current situation to
the Agricultural Statistics Board (ASB). The ASB uses the survey data and the
State analyses to prepare the published November 1 forecasts.

Revision policy: The November 1 production forecast will not be revised;
instead, a new forecast will be made each month throughout the growing
season. End-of-season estimates are made after harvest. At the end of the
marketing season, a balance sheet is calculated using carryover stocks,
production, exports, millings, feeding, and ending stocks. Revisions are then
made if the balance sheet relationships or other administrative data warrant
changes. Estimates of planted acres for spring planted crops are subject to
revision in the August Crop Production report if conditions altered the
planting intentions since the mid-year survey. Current year, planted acres
may also be revised for cotton, peanuts, and rice in the September Crop
Production report each year; spring wheat, Durum wheat, barley, and oats only
in the Small Grains Summary report at the end of September; and all other
spring planted crops in the October Crop Production report. Revisions to
planted acres will only be made when either special survey data,
administrative data, such as Farm Service Agency program “sign up” data, or
remote sensing data are available. Harvested acres may be revised any time a
production forecast is made if there is strong evidence that the intended
harvested area has changed since the last forecast.

Reliability: To assist users in evaluating the reliability of the November 1
production forecast, the “Root Mean Square Error,” a statistical measure
based on past performance, is computed. The deviation between the November 1
production forecast and the final estimate is expressed as a percentage of
the final estimate. The average of the squared percentage deviations for the
latest 20-year period is computed. The square root of the average becomes
statistically the “Root Mean Square Error.” Probability statements can be
made concerning expected differences in the current forecast relative to the
final end-of-season estimate, assuming that factors affecting this year’s
forecast are not different from those influencing recent years. For example,
the “Root Mean Square Error” for the November 1 corn for grain production
forecast is 1.2 percent. This means that chances are 2 out of 3 that the
current production forecast will not be above or below the final estimate by
more than 1.2 percent. Chances are 9 out of 10 (90 percent confidence level)
that the difference will not exceed 2.0 percent.

Also, shown in the following table is a 20-year record for selected crops of
the differences between the November 1 forecast and the final estimate. Using
corn again as an example, changes between the November 1 forecast and the
final estimate during the last 20 years have averaged 97.0 million bushels,
ranging from 26.0 million bushels to 214 million bushels. The November 1
forecast has been below the final estimate 8 times and above 12 times. This
does not imply that the November 1 corn forecast this year is likely to
understate or overstate final production.

Reliability of November 1 Crop Production Forecasts
[Based on data for the past twenty years]
————————————————————————————————
: : : Difference between forecast
: : : and final estimate
: : :—————————————-
: :90 percent : Production : Years
Crop : Root mean :confidence :—————————————-
:square error: interval : : : : Below : Above
: : :Average:Smallest:Largest: final : final
————————————————————————————————
: —- percent — —– millions —– number
:
Corn for grain ……..bushels: 1.2 2.0 97 26 214 8 12
Fall potatoes ………….cwt: 1.5 2.6 5 1 15 14 6
Rice ………………….cwt: 1.6 2.7 2 – 6 13 7
Sorghum for grain …..bushels: 5.8 10.0 18 1 86 7 13
Soybeans for beans ….bushels: 1.4 2.4 33 2 83 9 11
Upland cotton 1/ ……..bales: 3.1 5.3 421 45 949 10 10
————————————————————————————————
– Represents zero.
1/ Quantity is in thousands of units.
2/ Excluding freeze and hurricane seasons.

Information Contacts

Listed below are the commodity statisticians in the Crops Branch of the National Agricultural
Statistics Service to contact for additional information. E-mail inquiries may be sent to
nass@nass.usda.gov

Lance Honig, Chief, Crops Branch………………………………………….. (202) 720-2127

Anthony Prillaman, Head, Field Crops Section……………………………….. (202) 720-2127
Brent Chittenden – Oats, Rye, Wheat…………………………………… (202) 720-8068
Cody Brokmeyer – Peanuts, Rice……………………………………….. (202) 720-7688
Angie Considine – Cotton, Cotton Ginnings, Sorghum……………………… (202) 720-5944
Chris Hawthorn – Corn, Flaxseed, Proso Millet………………………….. (202) 720-9526
Brent Chittenden – Crop Weather, Barley, Hay…………………………… (202) 720-8068
Travis Thorson – Soybeans, Sunflower, Other Oilseeds……………………. (202) 720-7369

Jorge Garcia-Pratts, Head, Fruits, Vegetables and Special Crops Section……….. (202) 720-2127
Jorge Garcia-Pratts – Fresh and Processing Vegetables, Onions, Strawberries.. (202) 720-2157
Fred Granja – Apples, Apricots, Cherries, Plums, Prunes, Tobacco ………… (202) 720-4288
LaKeya Jones – Citrus, Coffee, Grapes, Sugar Crops, Tropical Fruits………. (202) 720-5412
Dave Losh – Hops……………………………………………………. (360) 709-2400
Dan Norris – Austrian Winter Peas, Dry Edible Peas, Lentils, Mint,
Mushrooms, Peaches, Pears, Wrinkled Seed Peas, Dry Beans …………… (202) 720-3250
Daphne Schauber – Berries, Cranberries, Potatoes, Sweet Potatoes ………… (202) 720-4285
Jorge Garcia-Pratts – Floriculture, Maple Syrup, Nursery, Tree Nuts ……… (202) 720-2127

Access to NASS Reports

For your convenience, you may access NASS reports and products the following
ways:

All reports are available electronically, at no cost, on the NASS web
site: http://www.nass.usda.gov

Both national and state specific reports are available via a free e-
mail subscription. To set-up this free subscription, visit
http://www.nass.usda.gov and in the “Follow NASS” box under “Receive
reports by Email,” click on “National” or “State” to select the reports
you would like to receive.

For more information on NASS surveys and reports, call the NASS Agricultural
Statistics Hotline at (800) 727-9540, 7:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET, or e-mail:
nass@nass.usda.gov.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination against
its customers, employees, and applicants for employment on the bases of race,
color, national origin, age, disability, sex, gender identity, religion,
reprisal, and where applicable, political beliefs, marital status, familial
or parental status, sexual orientation, or all or part of an individual’s
income is derived from any public assistance program, or protected genetic
information in employment or in any program or activity conducted or funded
by the Department. (Not all prohibited bases will apply to all programs
and/or employment activities.)
If you wish to file a Civil Rights program complaint of discrimination,
complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form (PDF), found online
at http://www.ascr.usda.gov/complaint_filing_cust.html, or at any USDA
office, or call (866) 632-9992 to request the form. You may also write a
letter containing all of the information requested in the form. Send your
completed complaint form or letter to us by mail at U.S. Department of
Agriculture, Director, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Avenue,
S.W., Washington, D.C. 20250-9410, by fax (202) 690-7442 or email at
program.intake@usda.gov.

 

Dry Pinto Bean Market News

US dry pinto bean prices stayed flat again this week as prices look to be settled for the near term. Growers are currently waiting for wet weather to subside across most of the country and haven’t had much of a chance to get into the fields. Flooding up in the Mindak area will contribute to further delays regarding planting, so we’ll just have to sit back and see what unfolds the next few weeks.

F. GARCIA REVISED LOGO