Michigan Black Beans At Parity Against North Dakota

Michigan Black Beans Versus North Dakota Black Beans

This week the United States Department of Agriculture released it’s weekly dry edible bean release with surprising data on Michigan black beans. As I was looking through the report and making my notes, I happened to notice Michigan black beans and North Dakota blacks were at parity. I have never seen North Dakota black beans above value over Michigan black beans, or even at parity! Historically speaking, Michigan black beans carry a premium over North Dakota blacks every year due to the growing conditions in Michigan which produces a very tender black bean. However, this year Michigan black beans have become scarce (at the moment) and it seems North Dakota has decided to ride Michigan’s coat tail into higher black bean prices (which I can’t blame them for). Black bean acres in North Dakota were a bit shy from their projected United States Department of Agriculture estimates earlier in the season, perhaps this could be a reason for the pop in prices this week…or maybe not.

One of the favorite meals in our house is pork loin served with white rice, salad and of course… black beans (just blogging about it makes my mouth water and opens up my appetite). Before you ask, yes. Our family uses Michigan black beans when cooking because we simply prefer Michigan black beans over North Dakota blacks. Michigan black beans are more tender in it’s raw uncooked state versus their North Dakota cousins due to the different growing conditions in both places. Michigan black beans will typically cook faster and should be softer when chewing versus North Dakota black beans.

So where are we heading with all this yip-yap on black beans? Oh yes, I remember now, it’s about parity. Should North Dakota black beans be the same price as Michigan black beans? Well…. that would depend on who is being asked the question. If your a grower from North Dakota, perhaps the answer would be yes they should be; however, if you ask a Michigan black bean grower then answer would probably be different.

I think the million dollar question should be explored further by way of “The Famous Michigan Vs North Dakota Black Bean Cook Off”!

-Okay, so technically there is not “a famous” black bean cook off…….yet!

But don’t worry folks, we have plenty of time to establish the first one in 2015! More to come on that later!

The USDA is not going to post any new prices until after the new year as most dry bean & pulse industry participants are getting ready for CHRISTmas and the holidays. Everyone needs time off during the year to wind down, spend time with their families, friends, and just enjoy life! This will leave the dry bean and pulse market “as is” until everyone is back from vacation next year (about 2-3 weeks).

I am posting my wife’s “truly famous” black bean recipe so you can try it for your next delicious family dinner, just follow the pictured instructions and enjoy!

As for me, I too will be on hiatus to enjoy my family, friends, and celebrate the reason for the season!

Dry Pinto Beans wants to wish everyone a very Merry CHRISTmas and Happy Holiday Season! We look forward to a healthy, prosperous, and exciting 2015 with all of you!

Sort Beans

Soak Beans

Soak Beans

Michigan Black Beans

Pressure Cook Beans

Chop Onion

Chop Onion

Chop Garlic

Chop Garlic

Add Canola Oil in Frying Pan

Add Canola Oil in Frying Pan

Stir & Cook

Stir & Cook

Golden Brown

Golden Brown

Cooked Beans

Pressure Cooked Beans

Add Cooked Onions & Garlic

Add Cooked Onions & Garlic

Add 1-2 Bay Leaves

Add 1-2 Bay Leaves

Boil Again for 10 mins

Boil Again for 10 mins

Michigan Black Beans

Serve Beans & Enjoy!

NASS Weekly Crop Progress Soybeans, Corn, Winter Wheat, Cotton, Sunflowers, Sorghum,

The National Agriculture Statistics Service data collected from the major agriculture growing states this week noted the development of corn, soybeans, peanuts, cotton, sorghum, sunflowers, and winter wheat harvest. Read the statistical results below.

Crop Progress

ISSN: 1948-3007

Released November 18, 2013, by the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS), Agricultural Statistics Board, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).

Corn Harvested – Selected States

[These 18 States harvested 93% of the 2012 corn acreage]

————————————————————————

                :               Week ending               :

                :—————————————–:

      State     :November 17, :November 10, :November 17, :  2008-2012

                :    2012     :    2013     :    2013     :   Average

————————————————————————

                :                        percent

                :

Colorado …….:      99            85            95            88

Illinois …….:     100            93            95            88

Indiana ……..:      98            85            92            89

Iowa ………..:      99            88            93            87

Kansas ………:     100            91            94            94

Kentucky …….:     100            90            94            99

Michigan …….:      92            62            75            79

Minnesota ……:     100            87            94            86

Missouri …….:     100            89            94            91

Nebraska …….:     100            81            91            83

North Carolina .:     100           100           100           100

North Dakota …:     100            64            78            69

Ohio ………..:      89            77            87            80

Pennsylvania …:      89            76            86            82

South Dakota …:     100            79            88            78

Tennessee ……:     100            93            98           100

Texas ……….:     100            98            99            98

Wisconsin ……:      97            62            74            79

                :

18 States ……:      99            84            91            86

————————————————————————

Soybeans Harvested – Selected States

[These 18 States harvested 95% of the 2012 soybean acreage]

————————————————————————

                :               Week ending               :

                :—————————————–:

      State     :November 17, :November 10, :November 17, :  2008-2012

                :    2012     :    2013     :    2013     :   Average

————————————————————————

                :                        percent

                :

Arkansas …….:      99            82            92            95

Illinois …….:     100            97            98            98

Indiana ……..:      99            93            97            98

Iowa ………..:     100            98            99            99

Kansas ………:      97            86            91            93

Kentucky …….:      95            66            78            93

Louisiana ……:     100           100           100            99

Michigan …….:     100            87            96            98

Minnesota ……:     100            98            99            99

Mississippi ….:     100            97            99            99

Missouri …….:      93            75            86            91

Nebraska …….:     100           100           100           100

North Carolina .:      53            29            50            51

North Dakota …:     100            95           100            96

Ohio ………..:      99            95           100            97

South Dakota …:     100            97           100            99

Tennessee ……:      96            56            75            93

Wisconsin ……:     100            86            93            98

                :

18 States ……:      98            91            95            96

————————————————————————

Cotton Harvested – Selected States

[These 15 States harvested 98% of the 2012 cotton acreage]

————————————————————————

                :               Week ending               :

                :—————————————–:

      State     :November 17, :November 10, :November 17, :  2008-2012

                :    2012     :    2013     :    2013     :   Average

————————————————————————

                :                        percent

                :

Alabama ……..:      88           58             80           79

Arizona ……..:      54           50             55           60

Arkansas …….:      99           88             96           94

California …..:      94           90             97           86

Georgia ……..:      71           47             62           70

Kansas ………:      76           31             43           47

Louisiana ……:     100           99            100           98

Mississippi ….:      99           93             97           96

Missouri …….:      94           64             75           92

North Carolina .:      76           44             62           79

Oklahoma …….:      78           46             57           59

South Carolina .:      72           46             61           76

Tennessee ……:      97           35             57           91

Texas ……….:      79           48             60           67

Virginia …….:      87           53             71           82

                :

15 States ……:      82           56             68           75

————————————————————————

Sorghum Harvested – Selected States

[These 11 States harvested 98% of the 2012 sorghum acreage]

————————————————————————

                :               Week ending               :

                :—————————————–:

      State     :November 17, :November 10, :November 17, :  2008-2012

                :    2012     :    2013     :    2013     :   Average

————————————————————————

                :                        percent

                :

Arkansas …….:     100           100           100           100

Colorado …….:      89            69            82            80

Illinois …….:     100            95            97            89

Kansas ………:      95            78            88            84

Louisiana ……:     100           100           100           100

Missouri …….:      95            86            93            89

Nebraska …….:     100            91            97            82

New Mexico …..:      75            29            65            65

Oklahoma …….:      98            76            84            78

South Dakota …:     100            81            88            91

Texas ……….:      90            92            95            86

                :

11 States ……:      93            85            91            86

————————————————————————

Sunflowers Harvested – Selected States

[These 4 States harvested 88% of the 2012 sunflower acreage]

————————————————————————

                :               Week ending               :

                :—————————————–:

      State     :November 17, :November 10, :November 17, :  2008-2012

                :    2012     :    2013     :    2013     :   Average

————————————————————————

                :                        percent

                :

Colorado …….:      93           83            94            85

Kansas ………:      92           70            87            80

North Dakota …:      95           45            63            87

South Dakota …:     100           52            62            83

                :

4 States …….:      97           51            65            85

————————————————————————

Peanuts Harvested – Selected States

[These 8 States harvested 96% of the 2012 peanut acreage]

————————————————————————

                :               Week ending               :

                :—————————————–:

      State     :November 17, :November 10, :November 17, :  2008-2012

                :    2012     :    2013     :    2013     :   Average

————————————————————————

                :                        percent

                :

Alabama ……..:      93           90             95           82

Florida ……..:     100           97             99           98

Georgia ……..:      99           91             97           92

North Carolina .:      98           98            100           96

Oklahoma …….:      88           85             93           88

South Carolina .:      98           97            100           97

Texas ……….:      98           92             97           92

Virginia …….:     100           93             96           98

                :

8 States …….:      98           93             97           92

————————————————————————

Winter Wheat Emerged – Selected States

[These 18 States planted 87% of the 2012 winter wheat acreage]

————————————————————————

                :               Week ending               :

                :—————————————–:

      State     :November 17, :November 10, :November 17, :  2008-2012

                :    2012     :    2013     :    2013     :   Average

————————————————————————

                :                        percent

                :

Arkansas …….:     81             55            70           69

California …..:     33             20            25           37

Colorado …….:     91             96           100           96

Idaho ……….:     94             86            95           95

Illinois …….:     86             77            86           84

Indiana ……..:     92             83            93           84

Kansas ………:     95             92            96           91

Michigan …….:     97             91            95           95

Missouri …….:     78             58            72           69

Montana ……..:     66             94            95           87

Nebraska …….:     92            100           100           98

North Carolina .:     29             25            40           36

Ohio ………..:     88             90            96           87

Oklahoma …….:     85             90            95           89

Oregon ………:     79             76            85           78

South Dakota …:     52             92            96           89

Texas ……….:     78             74            79           74

Washington …..:     93             88            93           91

                :

18 States ……:     83             84            89           85

————————————————————————

Winter Wheat Condition – Selected States: Week Ending November 17, 2013 [National crop conditions for selected States are weighted based on 2012 planted acreage]

—————————————————————————-

      State     : Very poor :   Poor    :   Fair    :   Good    : Excellent

—————————————————————————-

                :                          percent

                :

Arkansas …….:     –           2          31          62           5

California …..:     –           –          30          30          40

Colorado …….:     1           4          41          47           7

Idaho ……….:     –           1           7          80          12

Illinois …….:     –           2          20          70           8

Indiana ……..:     1           1          21          65          12

Kansas ………:     1           2          32          58           7

Michigan …….:     –           1          18          64          17

Missouri …….:     –           –          50          47           3

Montana ……..:     1           7          35          32          25

Nebraska …….:     –           3          25          63           9

North Carolina .:     –           1          35          64           –

Ohio ………..:     –           1          14          64          21

Oklahoma …….:     1           4          22          59          14

Oregon ………:     –           –          22          76           2

South Dakota …:     –           2          27          60          11

Texas ……….:     7          16          40          29           8

Washington …..:     –           2          14          65          19

                :

18 States ……:     2           5          30          52          11

                :

Previous week ..:     1           4          30          55          10

Previous year ..:     5          19          42          30           4

—————————————————————————-

–  Represents zero.

Crop Progress and Condition Tables Expected Next Week

Corn: Harvested

Cotton: Harvested

Sorghum: Harvested

Sunflowers: Harvested

Winter Wheat: Emerged, Condition

Statistical Methodology

Survey Procedures: Crop progress and condition estimates are based on survey data collected each week from early April through the end of November. The non-probability crop progress and condition surveys include input from approximately 4,000 respondents whose occupations provide them opportunities to make visual observations and frequently bring them in contact with farmers in their counties. Based on standard definitions, these respondents subjectively estimate the progress of crops through various stages of development, as well as the progress of producer activities. They also provide subjective evaluations of crop conditions.

Most respondents complete their questionnaires on Friday or early Monday morning and submit them to the National Agricultural Statistics Service

(NASS) Field Offices in their States by mail, telephone, fax, e-mail, or through a secured internet website. A small number of reports are completed on Thursday, Saturday, and Sunday. Regardless of when questionnaires are completed, respondents are asked to report for the entire week ending on Sunday. For reports submitted prior to the Sunday reference date, a degree of uncertainty is introduced by projections for weekend changes in progress and condition. By the end of the 2012 season, over 90 percent of the data were being submitted through the internet website. As a result, the majority of all data are submitted on Monday morning, significantly reducing projection uncertainty.

Respondents are sent written reporting instructions at the beginning of each season and are contacted periodically to ensure proper reporting. Terms and definitions of crop stages and condition categories used as reporting guidelines are available on the NASS website at www.nass.usda.gov/Publications/National_Crop_Progress.

Estimating Procedures: Reported data are reviewed for reasonableness and consistency by comparing with data reported the previous week and data reported in surrounding counties for the current week. Each State Field Office summarizes the reported data to district and State levels, weighting each county’s reported data by NASS county acreage estimates. Summarized indications are compared with previous week estimates, and progress items are compared with earlier stages of development and historical averages to ensure reasonableness. Weather events and respondent comments are also taken into consideration. State estimates are submitted to the Agricultural Statistics Board (ASB) along with supporting comments, where they are compared with surrounding States and compiled into a National level summary by weighting each State by its acreage estimates.

Revision Policy: Progress and condition estimates in the Crop Progress report are released after 4:00 pm ET on the first business day of the week. These estimates are subject to revision the following week.

Information Contacts

Listed below are the commodity statisticians in the Crops Branch of the National Agricultural Statistics Service to contact for additional information. E-mail inquiries may be sent to nass@nass.usda.gov

Lance Honig, Chief, Crops Branch……………………… (202) 720-2127

Anthony Prillaman, Head, Field Crops Section…………… (202) 720-2127

     Brent Chittenden – Oats, Rye, Wheat………………. (202) 720-8068

     Cody Brokmeyer – Peanuts, Rice…………………… (202) 720-7688

     Angie Considine – Cotton, Cotton Ginnings, Sorghum…. (202) 720-5944

     Chris Hawthorn – Corn, Flaxseed, Proso Millet……… (202) 720-9526

     Tony Dahlman – Crop Weather, Barley, Hay………….. (202) 720-7621

     Travis Thorson – Soybeans, Sunflower, Other Oilseeds.. (202) 720-7369

Access to NASS Reports

For your convenience, you may access NASS reports and products the following

ways:

                All reports are available electronically, at no cost, on the NASS web

site: http://www.nass.usda.gov

                Both national and state specific reports are available via a free e- mail subscription. To set-up this free subscription, visit http://www.nass.usda.gov and in the “Follow NASS” box under “Receive reports by Email,” click on “National” or “State” to select the reports you would like to receive.

For more information on NASS surveys and reports, call the NASS Agricultural Statistics Hotline at (800) 727-9540, 7:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET, or e-mail:

nass@nass.usda.gov.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination against its customers, employees, and applicants for employment on the bases of race, color, national origin, age, disability, sex, gender identity, religion, reprisal, and where applicable, political beliefs, marital status, familial or parental status, sexual orientation, or all or part of an individual’s income is derived from any public assistance program, or protected genetic information in employment or in any program or activity conducted or funded by the Department. (Not all prohibited bases will apply to all programs and/or employment activities.) If you wish to file a Civil Rights program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form (PDF), found online at http://www.ascr.usda.gov/complaint_filing_cust.html, or at any USDA office, or call (866) 632-9992 to request the form. You may also write a letter containing all of the information requested in the form. Send your completed complaint form or letter to us by mail at U.S. Department of Agriculture, Director, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20250-9410, by fax (202) 690-7442 or email at program.intake@usda.gov.